KC Royals Manager Nearly Dies From Treestand Fall

I was talking with Jay Everett of Hunter Safety System the other day about the number of treestand fatalities that have already taken place for the 2017/2018 hunting season. Jay passed along some information he received from Glen Mayhew, president of the Tree Stand Safety Awareness  foundation. Sadly, there has already been 9 treestand fatalities that have made media coverage. It’s a grim reminder that we need to tighten up. We need to preach the use of the Lifeline. It’s not enough to simply wear a harness and anchor in once you climb into the stand. The accidents are happening as hunters are ascending or descending the stand, and when they are working on stands.

One story in particular making the rounds in the media is the fall of Kansas City Royals manager, Ned Yost. Yost, an avid deer hunter, fell from his treestand recently. The accident nearly cost him his life.

“I reached around to hook into the tree, and right as I grabbed my strap to reach up to hook into the tree, it was like a hangman’s gallow, the stand just let go – down I went,” Yost said. “It was a massive fracture of the pelvis, and I’m glad to be alive.”

Ned-Yost

Yost is lucky to be alive after an ugly fall from a treestand. (wibwnewsnow.com)

As the number of treestand fatalities grows, Yost is thankful that he’s not on that side of the statistics. As bad as it was, he counts his blessings that he escaped with only a fractured pelvis and broken ribs.

“There’s no doubt I would have bled out if I didn’t have my cellphone with me,” he said. “There was nobody that was coming. Nobody would have found me. I would have been dead by nightfall.”

After calling his wife and son for help, Yost was airlifted from the scene and taken to a nearby hospital.

“Once I got to the hospital, they got me on the table, and all of a sudden I felt a shot. The doctor had drilled a hole through my leg and through my bone and inserted a rod into it,” Yost said.

“I kept asking, ‘What are you doing?’ The trauma surgeon said, ‘We got to do this to save your life.’ I’m like, ‘Save my life? What are you talking about?’ What I didn’t notice was that they kept giving me units of blood. They gave me seven or eight units of blood. They said, ‘Look, your pelvis is full of blood vessels and arteries, and when you shatter it like you did, you have a lot of bleeding in there. We have to get it stopped.'”

Yost is expected to be wheelchair bound for the next few months as he recovers from his treestand accident.

Again, make sure you’re anchored to the tree from the time your feet leave the ground with the Lifeline system. Treestand accidents would pretty much be a thing of the past if hunters would use the Lifeline. Check them out at www.huntersafetysystem.com.

Comments

  1. Roger Ruchti says:

    I have seen different “off” brand life lines for sale in different stores like the Farm & Home stores, big box stores, etc. Is there any standard or label to look for on these lifelines?

    Reply
  2. Hunter Safety Systems Life Lines. Although the Muddy outdoors ones seem to use a climbing rope and look pretty nice. If you have climbing rope ect you can make one by tying a prusik knot.

    Reply
  3. Any of the makers rope is probably more than sufficient, but, I like the HSS because the prussic knot doesn’t get bound up and hard to slide, but it locks down instantly if you pull on the carabiner. It also has a cover over the Carabiner so it doesn’t clang against the ladder or steps or whatever your’e climbing on.

    Reply
  4. I hunt 99 % of the time using a climbing tree stand and I hunt alone in multiple counties in multiple states. I always use a lifeline while I’m climbing up the tree, down the tree and while I’m sitting in the tree. I love the life lines cause I’m always attached to the tree and have a line to slowly descend down the tree if anything goes wrong with the tree stand. Using the lifeline up and down the tree only takes a few extra seconds and is the cheapest life/injury insurance you could ever buy and use. The lifeline is not just for permanent stands or ladder stands; it should be used with all stands. I use the seat of the pants harness with the fanny pack on the back and store the lifeline int there as I travel to and from my tree(s). It’s so simple so easy and it’s just a no brainer to use the life line. If you don’t use it for yourself at least use it for the ones that love you and need you.

    Reply
  5. Brian J Schrift says:

    If anyone who does not use a Lifeline please allow me to take a Life Insurance policy out on you. If you are too cheap or just too lazy to use one, stay on the ground….better yet…stay at home…your giving the rest of the hunters a bad name. It’s like the old cars that didn’t have seat belts…who’s brilliant idea was it to leave the seat belts out….dummies…

    Reply
    • Get off your high horse. Some of us have been on this earth longer than you. When I started hunting the only tree stands were rare and expensive. I built my own… Safety harnesses did not exist. Cars had lap belts and headlights that dimmed using a foot switch. Safety equipment, like everything else in this world evolves with time.

      Reply
  6. Brian J Schrift says:

    Dan, I couldn’t agree with you more…it does evolve over the course of time and for that I am thankful..my point is that the safety has evolved, it’s here, it’s less expensive than any bow or gun that you can by, so if someone chooses to not take advantage of the safety and technology that we do have then, in my opinion, they should consider carefully if it is the right thing to do for the sake of their own lives. Lastly, all it takes is one bad accident of a celebrity hunter (such as the Dodgers coach) to get the attention of some over zealous law maker to stir the pot and try to put more of a strangle hold on the privilege and the right to hunt and enjoy God’s awesome Creation. By the way, I am 45 years old and I have been hunting with my brothers and Dad since I was 6 years old. We used to go hunting in a 1963 VW Truck and my brother held Himself in a tree stand by the belt he had around his waist.

    Reply

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