The Miseducation of the Kendall Jones Story

Kendall Jones is a nineteen year old Texas Tech cheerleader who loves to hunt big game on the Dark Continent of Africa. She’s been doing so with her father since she was thirteen years of age. She has gotten a lot of publicity lately after a small group of animal loving fanatics reacted poorly to posted photographs on her Facebook page, as she stood over some endangered animals with a gleam in her eyes and a smile she wore from ear to ear. This group started a campaign to delete her photos on the social media giant’s website through the power of petition, and earlier this week there motion was carried. Facebook, arguably one of the last bastions of up-yours to the world’s super powers of government and corporation left on earth, turned its back on the young lady and her respective right to do nothing wrong. They have officially removed the photos of her and the many trophies of Africa she was posed with.

kendall jones lion

College Cheerleader and avid outdoorsgirl Kendall Jones has received hundreds of threats on her life for legally taking several African animals including the lion shown above.  

The company issued a statement that they will take down any content “that promotes poaching of endangered species, the sale of animals for organized fight or content that includes extreme acts of animal abuse.”

Ms. Jones is clearly innocent of all these charges. Ms. Jones took every one of her animals legally; none of them were used in a fight and none of her content shows or even remotely gives the impression of abuse. She didn’t beat the animals with a club; she took them with a weapon. In fact, a closer examination into the story of her and the rare rhino reveals that she took the animal by way of a tranquilizer dart after it had been recently attacked by a lion and injured. A veterinarian was able to take a closer examination and give some care to the animal while it was under. If anything, the only abuse one can draw conclusion to is the lack of factual information being shared by many major media outlets that seem to be deliberately promoting the story with unscientific views and opinions. Either that or they simply aren’t doing their jobs, mainly the actual research portion.

kendall jones with rhino

Kendall Jones shown here with a Rhino after she darted it. A local veterinarian closely examined the animal after a recent lion attack. No harm was done to the animal. Except by the lion of course.

Many seem to be withholding the truth in this story – including Ms. Jones.

Let me preface that I am a whitetail deer hunter and only a whitetail deer hunter. My reasons are simple. I only kill what I eat, just as my dad taught me from when I was a young boy. I know I am supposed to be sticking up for all hunters but cannot always do so as I simply do not agree with all hunters. I imagine the same rings true in all walks of life.

Ms. Jones has replied and stated on more than one occasion that she hunts these Dr. Seuss like creatures to help feed the local community and that hunting these animals is just “good conservation”.

I am a hunter and I find that hard to believe. I find it hard to believe that anyone would travel halfway around the world, pay well into the five figures, and then say they did it all for anything less than the future taxidermy bill, the trophy, and the bragging rights. I am smart enough to recognize that you did not spend the thousands more it would have cost to get that zebra meat home – all of it. And if you’re not consuming the table fare the animal you took blessed you with, then why kill it in the first place?

Justifying a kill by spouting words of goodwill doesn’t mean you’re doing goodwill. No, your intentions when spending that kind of money are to kill a trophy (and rare) dodo.

This is a fine line. This is where the character that is Ms. Jones and I take different paths. This is where our two fathers, if they ever were to meet, would not have seen eye to eye. And that is what the soul of hunting is, it’s the passion and tradition handed down by our parents and their parents before them. That is something the anti-hunting community will never understand and consequently never break. No one polices their own like we do. We know all too well the truth that is out there in the field, on the water and in the woods. While some may question and even bash me because of my stance against such hunting, I believe this is the kind of rhetoric that only makes our little community stronger.

I don’t condemn Ms. Jones and her ways of hunting. I just don’t support them either. I know the facts, and I don’t deviate from the truth. Ms. Jones did nothing wrong when she visited Africa to hunt alongside her father. Each and every animal was taken with legal means and within her own right. I respect that.

In fact, I hope to bring my daughters into the sport one day. I hope to teach them just as my dad did with me. If this young Texan helps me get them interested through her on-field leadership of woman in hunting, then by all means Ms. Jones keep doing what you’re doing. The parenting will be my responsibility and not yours. It will be my responsibility to show them the difference between our two respective ideas of hunting. The difference between me and the anti-hunting community is that I get that. They can never understand hunting because they have never tried it. Never seen their dog’s true love of life as it waits beside you as a flock of geese bust in. Never heard the bugle of an elk so close it shatters your every nerve. Never seen the sun rise while sitting twenty feet closer to God. 

The antis think we’re all crazy, blood thirsty savages, and that they have all the answers for how we all should act and live. I think of that seldom as I enjoy what Mother Earth blesses me with each summer night alongside my grill.

Kendall Jones may not be hunting’s greatest posterchild, but she is certainly not the blood thirsty savage that many have made her out to be. She’s just a daughter, hunting with her dad.

 

 



Comments

  1. amanita virosa says:

    It's illegal to bring the meat here from Africa. Get your facts straight, it's not a money issue. BTW, how did you cook up those coyotes and carp that you killed? 😉

    Reply
  2. Mike Willand says:

    Amanita, I don't recall ever killing a carp. I think you have your facts backwards. Coyotes yes, a few of those. But here in the suburbs of Chicago where they are grossly over populated and unhunted, yes I've taken some and against my fathers wishes and not eaten them. But a vast majority I let go for personal reasons.

    Glad you took the time to read my article and pull nothing from it but your own vanity I assume. I mean, should I had written for the hunters of Africa to stay in Africa to consume the meat of the 8 different species of animal they took instead. Couldn't you do that?

    Reply
  3. And this is where I dump bowhunting.com Good job Mike, Piss off your hunters.

    Reply
  4. Mike, you are arrogantly ignorant and a straight up hypocrite. Please leave the hunting industry. We definitely don't need nor want you.

    Reply
  5. Jason Lawrence says:

    I can't believe the ignorance of the posts above me. I stand proud when I say I know Mike Willand and will say he is one of the most knowledgeable and humble hunters I know. I agree with most of what Mike posted here. She didn't go to Africa to hunt food for the needy, she went for a trophy. My father raised me much in the way Mike was raised, kill what you plan to eat. I know people who have hunted Africa and it doesn't interest me and the cost makes it a wealthy mans game. Anyone saying you are dumping this site or calling Mike a hypocrite are not looking into the mirror enough. Maybe if you re-read the story a couple times and let it sink in it will make sense, then again maybe many of you would rather just judge a guy that happens to be one of the greatest hunters and dudes I have met through this great way of life.

    Reply
  6. Yes a waste.. Ooooh I hunted the smartest animal to have some horns on my wall and terrible, tough, horrible meat….. Waste of air. Hunt for food not bragging rights.

    Reply
  7. You're article is not completely correct, which infortunately takes away from you're credibility. I read it as I don't support her, however, I am not against her. I think you have a flawed paradigm, in that all legal and ethical hunting should be supported. Legal and ethical trophy hunting does add to conservation and commerce.

    Reply
  8. Paul Godwin says:

    Mike,
    Thanks for the information you have provided in regards to Kendall. You can never trust what one hears from the media. In regards to the purpose of her hunting; I too think you are spot on. Although, I'd say one needs to be wary about assuming another’s intents, it doesn’t seem as if there would be any other reason for those “harvests.”

    Reply
  9. There are restaurants in parts of Africa that offer such game on their menus. I know this because I am friends with a man who is from Kenya. It is indeed a conservation thing at times. Me and him have spoken about it often. There are few things that are never on a menu, such as elephant. The rhino was not taken. It was examined right. And don't tell me, that if you had the choice of taking a shot on an 8 point vs a 4 point, that you wouldn't take the 8. It is possible to hunt for food and trophy all in one shot. People/fellow hunters donate wild game here in America all the time. Why couldn't that happen in Africa as well. You really think they just shoot it, take a picture, and walk away? I think not.

    Reply
  10. Great Article. I agree with Mike 100%. Bowhunting.com blog just got a new follower!

    Reply
  11. Y Derington. Clebu says:

    I completely understand and agree with most everything Mike said. While big game trophy hunting is not something I can afford to do, I say more power to you Kendall. And remember while she couldn't bring the meat home because it is illegal, she did donate it to the villages where she hunted feeding hundreds of people.
    Yes she will keep her trophies. I'm sure that no one has any trouble with other athletes who keep the trophies of their success.

    Reply
  12. So you are saying you have never hoped for or waited for a big buck? Cuz that would have put you in the trophy hunting category. You wouldnt want to be a hypocrit now.. or you saying you have never taken a coyote to help deer populations? Cuz that would make you the same as Kendall taking an african predator to help other game and protect villagers from a nusance animal… just because we are in north america doesnt mean we arent doing exactly what kendall is doing. You lost another follower with this radiculous article.

    Reply
  13. Mike –
    You should quite your job. As stated above, it is illegal to bring meat back from other countries, so yes the amount of money dumped into that little village and meat provided is fantastic. Im sure you dont go for whatever whitetail you see, you probably wait until you find the biggest one…

    Reply
  14. Jonathan says:

    Between license fees and giving the meat to the surrounding community her

    Reply
  15. Mike, I agree with most of what you say here, but you did have some missteps in the article, specifically on shipping the meat back. I'm not sure that I would ever be interested in hunting dangerous game, but I've taken a great deal of time to reflect on these story's of those who do hunt in Africa. Donating the meat is nothing but the norm, and I see that similar to those who donate meat to hunters for the hungry in the US. Also, I know better than to say it's just about the trophy. That booner may look good on the wall, but what you remember is the effort and adventure of the hunt. We, as a community, just need to make sure that we don't hunt trophy whitetails the same way. At the end of the day, the antis would have all hunting banned, so I'm inclined to stick up for those with the money and interest for these adventures if for nothing else than to gaurd against a slippery slope.

    Reply
  16. Justin Zarr says:

    I think one of the biggest threats to the hunting industry is simply our own ignorant blindness to the reality of things. Like Mike I stand behind Kendall's legal right to hunt these animals and have no problem with her doing so despite the fact that it may not be my personal cup of tea. However I think the danger lays in the fact that many hunters simply fail to stand up and say "I hunt because I enjoy it. I enjoy the thrill of the chase and I enjoy the feeling of accomplishment after a successful hunt". There is nothing wrong with that yet we all too often hide behind the ancillary benefits of conservation as the primary driver for our desire to shoot animals. I simply think we need to be more honest with ourselves and with the non-hunting public. Educating them on the benefits of hunting is one thing, standing up for our personal beliefs and desires in another.

    Also, let's not forget this is an opinion piece. The opinion of the writer, right or wrong, is his opinion alone.

    Reply
  17. Actually she gives the animals to villages and tribes in need and the money that she pays to hunt goes to conserving the animals so I am with her all the way.

    Reply
  18. Stephen Robinson says:

    We are all trophy hunters in a way and we all do it for personal gain. The fact that she talks about conservation doesn't bother me one bit. Mainly because the money she spends in Africa truly does contribute to conservation. Similar to the money we spend on tags for hunting deer here. If you asked her why she hunts, I'm sure she's going to tell you because she loves it, not because she is only concerned with conservation. I don't feel she is hiding behind conservation, I feel like she is pointing out that conservation is why there are still viable populations of animals that might otherwise be endangered or extinct. People that pay for those hunts, contribute to that conservation effort way more than any tree hugging, animal living PETA member ever will. The great thing about hunting is that these animals are a renewable resource as long as we all hunt responsibly.

    Reply
  19. Love the article mike, especially the quote from Fred Bear you added in there.

    Reply
  20. Chuck Wolf says:

    Mike – Very good article and I for one completely agree with you and I understand what your talking about without getting hung up on the literals of it.

    I hunt for food, the hunt itself is my trophy. I will take pictures of what I have harvested to show my respect for it, I will be smiling with pride of myself for a quick clean kill. I will not be going to another country just to kill an animal so I can hang its head or hide on my wall. I will also kill predators when the occasion arises to ensure that I have the ability to take meat on the property in the fall.

    It gives me pride knowing that I provided meat for my family that is truly organic and not hopped up on who knows what the meat in the store is filled with and that it was killed for more humanely than the cattle were for the Anti's steak dinner.

    Kendall did not go to Africa to hunt for food that was your point. I get it. She can be very proud of herself for the trophy's she has taken legally and the animals that she do

    Reply
  21. There ya go; only shoot what you plan on eating. Why else? And personally, I'm totally underwhelmed with someone killing anything with a gun for the most part. If this chick took a lion with her bare hands, I'd be impressed lol. She's full of crap though, which isn't a shock. I wonder about the legality of shooting supposedly endangered species; shouldn't we…I don't know, let them propagate and potentially rebuild their populations? I know there are breeds of Rhino that are EXTINCT due to over hunting; I guess I'll go and research the laws regarding that; I am an AVID gun enthusiast and shooter, and I have no problem with hunting; our ancestors have done it for eons, but shooting endangered species to look cool, legal or not just doesn't sit right with me.

    Reply
  22. Gary Larson says:

    So will Facebook take down the photos of every hunter who is posing with a legally harvested whitetail? How about they start be removing the uploaded videos of people being attacked by gangs and street fights of innocent people being pummeled.

    Reply
  23. Now you're attacking hunters because Anti's are attack you? It's his opinion same with the anti's. Respect a persons opinion and don't bash it. I'm a kid and I know better than to do that. Grow up.

    Reply
  24. Mike, I understand your point of view, but I don't share your judgmental criticism towards this young lady. Of course she is over their hunting for more than the conservation. I think your taking her comments out of context. Her comments are replies to the animal rights activist attempting to inform them that what she is doing has an overall good outcome for all that is involved including the species that she hunts, even if it is for the trophies. Who are we to make the judgment that what she is doing is wrong or unethical? If there is one think I have learned through my life as a hunter it is to not speak ill about others, because they are hunting in a different way, a different species or for different reasons then we are use to. Many of times I have had harsh thoughts about others for these reasons only to have my eyes opened later in my life to their situations. For example, when I was younger I saw a bow hunter shoot a bull elk with a clean pass through and witness the bull elk ru

    Reply
  25. Mike, you nailed it. I am a female hunter-in-training, and I think it sucks that female hunters are only shown in these ridiculous canned hunts. It makes it look like women can't actually take down an animal unless it's in a fully stocked 'conservation' park. Also? The folks marketing these women play up the fact that she's a cheerleader- like a cheerleader is only there to be pretty and not able to have other marketable skills.

    Reply
  26. Kimberly Brown says:

    Don't forget the reason why these hunts cost into the five figures. A good portion of the money that people like Kendall Jones pay to participate in one of these hunts goes toward the research and conservation of the very animals hunted. Any experienced hunter knows the importance of wildlife management and conservation that make this wonderful sport possible. The hunting industry is doing amazing things for the economy of South Africa as well as the protection and conservation of the beautiful creatures that roam there. Too many people are extremely misinformed on this subject.

    Reply
  27. I disagree with the judgmental tone of the article. A teenage girl received death threats from a bunch of radical nut jobs. Our response as the hunting community should be to support her 100%. criticizing the teenage girl for the way she responded to the death threats is ridiculous.

    Reply
  28. Stuart Caesar says:

    Mike's just flat out wrong. There's nothing wrong with trophy hunting, as long as it's done legally. Ted Nugent is a perfect example of a trophy hunter who is also a strong conservationist as well.But , lets face it, to say you're a hunter for conservation reasons or feeding your family reasons, you're just living in denial. The reason we hunt is for the fun of it!If it wasn't fun , we wouldn't do it.Bowhunting , in particular, is the ultimate sport, man against nature , with the most basic of weapons. We're natural predators. It's our instinct to hunt, just like the Lion Kendall took down. So, let's stop being hypocrites and just admit that we're bowhunters because its the greatest sport on earth and the most fun!

    Reply
  29. Mike is 100% correct, it's ok to be proud of what you kill, it's ok to be happy and excited. It's ok to say, I killed it because it was legal and I wanted too.

    Reply
  30. Tim Stratton says:

    Judging someone because they want the trophy seems kind of two-faced to me. You say they don't need the trophy… I say you don't need the venison you keep either… Get to a grocery store man, they got food. Lots of it.

    Hunting is almost never about the needs of the hunter… It can be about the needs of the animals and the communities around them.

    We hunters hunt for many reasons. For pleasure of being outdoors, alone or with friends. For the thrill of the sport. For the quality of food on your table. For the bragging rights associated with the challenges of taking the biggest buck out there…

    And since there are very few, if any cases where someone "needs to hunt" we are all doing it for reasons that can be judged by someone who holds a different or opposite opinion. I've heard people say "that guy doesn't know how to hunt, he just sits out there in his stand and waits for whatever walks by"… well maybe that guy just loves sitting outdoors? And what's wrong wit

    Reply
  31. Hey, Jason Lawrence, maybe the Miseducation of Mike Williard is that his daddy didn't teach him that you shouldn't talk about other people's daddy's and you shouldn't call people a liar without offering evidence. Mike wanted to write an article on him personally passing a moral and ethical judgment on Kendall Jones, but sugarcoating it just enough to not make everyone mad. That was obvious from the title of the article. The worst part is he did it by insulting her father and calling her a liar. Not only is that straight out bad journalism but it is so disrespectful and condescending.
    He also wanted to make sure that everyone knew that he takes the moral high ground by living by the rule that "you only kill what you eat." He should realize that most are taught that to be respectful and not wasteful. It's not to rationalize why we hunt. Because every hunter that is not living in the woods or having economic problems is hunting for the joy of hunting. To state otherwise is an obvi

    Reply
  32. I hunt whitetail deer in Missouri and I harvest more then one deer a year and give it to the poor … So that being said I'm doing the same a Ms. Jones.. My father also taught to me only kill what I eat … But the way I see it is if if get ate then there is no big deal.. I duck hunt with my brother cause he loves it and loves duck , I don't like duck but it's getting eaten .. So I say way to go Ms. Jones and awesome pictures

    Reply
  33. She is hunting for sport and trophy… If you hunt for the same you are a waste of air.

    Reply
  34. Hunting for sport or trophy makes you a waste of air? Maybe you have never heard of a TROPHY FEE? Like the author, I don't think very many people can comprehend how different life is over there. The human/animal interaction,or the locals mindset of survival. They have livestock too, what's to keep them from illegally taking every big cat in site?.. that's right, the guy willing to pay for it instead.

    Is she doing solely for conservation, or to eat? Of course not, but who gives? The animal is still going to good use, regardless of whose mouth it feeds.

    If you dont trophy hunt, even for trophy whitetails, you're not hunting the most salty, smartest creatures in the woods. Doesn't have to do with morals, just sharpening that natural instinct of being the top predator

    Reply
  35. Mike,

    I found this article somewhat disheartening. It's okay if hunting in Africa (or any other part of the world) isn't your cup of tea, but some of the things said in this article were out of line.

    First, it's illegal to import meat back into the United States. So to even suggest that she should have done so is a non-issue. Did she go over with the sole purpose of taking a trophy? Was it for the challenge? The truth is, only God knows her heart. What we do know is that from her endeavors, people were fed and money was pumped back into conservation for these "Dr. Seuss like creatures". To me, that's a win.

    Second, the hunting community is under attack from enough people. We don't need fractures from within. While it's ok to disagree with the girl, I think you may have inadvertently set yourself up as being morally superior to her. That's not what we need. We need support and solidarity. I don't use a crossbow and have no desire to, but I'm not going to tear down my brother who u

    Reply
  36. The Miseducation, misguided efforts, and mis-information of Mike Willand. That should really be the title here on this article. I found the article to be disheartening and a blow to hunting rights and conservation efforts we have all worked so hard to achieve. Mike Willand, and any other contributor to Bowhunting.com, are supposed to be advocates for bow hunting, hunting in general, safety, and I would also hope for conservation. It is simple, without conservation and hunters there would be no hunting. The endangered species would be extinct species. It is really sad to see a person in Mike’s position cutting down and making negative comments about other hunters, especially that of a teenage girl and her father whom I am assuming he knows nothing about. You are basically calling them liars and stating that you cannot agree with their way of hunting. As another person who commented on here stated, you did not know and you cannot presume to know what Kendall and her father's inte

    Reply
  37. Assuming the majority of them don't, I wish sport hunters would ask themselves a series of questions (and be truthful with themselves at least in answering) before they justify or defend their so called "sport". 1) Do they believe that most animals – especially those they prey on – have a degree of consciousness and possible feelings that they cannot comprehend? Or are all animals merely dumb beasts without any awareness and degree of feeling? If so then why not hunt dogs and cats? In fact, why have pets at all? 2) Setting aside the spin they sell on helping the people in the areas they hunt, what do they think gives them the right to go into the wild – especially in a foreign and often times impoverished land to kill an animal and if the kill isn't instantaneous possibly cause the animal incredible suffering? The fact that they're human? The pinnacle of evolution? 3) Do they honestly believe – whether it's in the actual wild or in a canned setting – that the animals they prey on

    Reply
  38. Fred Yogi says:

    Would it be ok to hunt 1 person legally if it meant being able to raise enough money to feed a thousand from that hunt?

    Reply
  39. Fred Yogi says:

    We'll written article mike, it's sad that the same people who are mad that the public is bashing on Kendall, is now bashing you for your opinion. Totally agree with you, you only hunt what you eat.

    Reply
  40. I'm sorry, but I do not agree with your stance that hunters should only kill what they intend to eat personally. The meat DID get eaten, just by the locals. There is nothing at all wrong with that. I have read in many places that meat from game hunters is usually the only meat the villagers get to eat. I have no idea if that is true or not, but the fact that it got eaten is good enough for me. Additionally, I do not think any hunter should have to apologize for enjoying the hunt or taking a trophy animal. Period. If you don't have a passion for the hunt, then it's time to stop. As for eating the meat, there are several situations in which killing and not eating are justified. Predator control, invasive species control and or taking an animal that is inedible are acceptable in my book.

    Reply
  41. Jake Yakey says:

    Get after it Kendall Jones!! Hunt to live, Live to hunt.

    Reply
  42. Manwell Haumu says:

    She can slay me anytime 😉

    Reply
  43. Before I write this, i skipped all of the posts above. Do you have any idea of where the money goes when someone does a hunt in Africa? If there was no monitary value on the hunt these animals would all be poached into extinction. The monies that good people have to spend on these hunts are used to provide habitat and guardianship so the poachers will not devastate the entire population! When there is a value placed on them they are worth saving! If hunters never traveled there they would just vanish and the locals would only be fed for a short time. The lasting benefit lasts for ever providing that all of it is done right. The meat of the animals ar donated to feed the local villages and the money spent provides jobs that would never exist otherwise. The resource is saved and everyone wins! How can you say if you do not eat it why kill it? The hunters coming from overseas are actually promoting the local economy! From trackers to tanners and Taxidermists. I have no idea why you took t

    Reply
  44. There, their or they're. Please figure it out.

    Reply
  45. I speak spanish so my post will be easier in my native language, forgive me for that…
    Soy, como muchos, un cazador desde que nací, me criaron para respetar las leyes y cazar animales sin abusar de ellos, en su mayoría los como o comparto con mis amigos y familares de la delicia de comer carne magra y natural…aun asi, creo que lo que esta niña hizo es el sueño de muchos de nosotros que no tenemos la posibilidad económica o el tiempo para pasar tantos días gozando una cacería en Africa, el continente soñado de un cazador; respeto los 2 puntos de vista que he estado leyendo desde el que caza para comer como el que caza legalmente para tener un trofeo…he vivido las 2 partes y creo que no tienen diferencia, la carne siempre se aprovecha ya sea por tu familia u otras familias en necesidad…creo firmemente que ser cazador tiene ciertas responsabilidades pero tambien creo que debemos siempre estar unidos en pro de la cacería legal y retadora y no darle opcion de critica a los "antis" ya

    Reply
  46. Michael Smith says:

    It always a small minority of people screaming about their false impressions, and getting their way. This is why I'm not on FaceBook, and why I will never be. Next it will be some other right that they will attacking, and people will just let them get away with it.

    Reply
  47. This article is disgusting. This is why the hunting tradition is dying because people like you won't even stand up and support other hunters under attack.

    Reply
  48. Was this a legal hunt in another country. Yes. Hunters against hunters. Not his first article against another hunter. I believe I read an article he wrote about Ted Nugent as well. Done with bowhunting.com.

    Reply
  49. Wow! Can you say divide and conquer? If hunters start fighting over the ethics of hunting, we and our right to hunt are doomed. People have spent so much time yelling about Mike being wrong, you are totally missing the fact that FB took the pics down as if they were wrong! While you may not agree with Mike (alot of people fought and died for your right to disagree with Mike as well as for Mikes right to his opinion) your outrage seems misdirected. What gives FB the right to censor pictures of a legal activity…they obviously have something against hunters/hunting…thats probably one of the reasons I took down my FB page. To all who are leaving the site because of Mike? We will miss you (big babies)…Me Im stayin…We need all the support we can get because everyone wants to take our weapons!

    Reply
  50. PoliTecs says:

    Let me just qualify myself first before I point out the stupidity of Jones' argument.

    I own guns, LOTS of guns, mostly rifles and shotguns because I love target shooting. The last time I actually killed an animal was in high school nearly 15 years ago. With modern means of acquiring food I just don't see the need or the justifying rationale such as the one presented here. I stopped because we are not in the 18th or early 19th century anymore. We have a more capitalistic and organized manors to acquire our game. Do I advocate and protest or even lobby to keep people from hunting and killing? Hell no! Some people live in extremely remote areas of the country and they actually kill for food consumption by necessity. Some go on outback excursions or months long “rough it” expeditions and they must eat. But 99% of the country and people do not so hunting to kill something as purely sport is stupid and this is where I diverge. I think Jones is one of these clowns. And I can assure you, he d

    Reply
  51. Greg Kohn says:

    I think it's great that she is doing what she love's to do. She isn't out getting high or shooting people like a lot of teen's do everyday. Keep it up girl, good luck on your next adventure. I honestly didn't realize how many vegetarian's we had in America. Every one of god's creature's has a place (next to the mash potatoe's and gravy) just sayin.

    Reply
  52. I believe we all hunt because we enjoy it, in this day and age no one has to hunt to feed their family, it's a choice we make. I think most of us try to harvest the largest whitetail buck that we can find, while passing smaller bucks and does. Isn't that in essence "trophy" hunting. We all have our own reasons for making the choices we do, but are quick to disagree with someone who does something different than ourselves. What is accepted as the "right" way to hunt in one area is frowned upon or illegal in another area. Does this make it wrong or right, or simply the time honored tradition.

    Reply
  53. WVridgerunner says:

    Mr. Willand,I find it interesting you know what's in a person's heart or mind for you to judge why she went there in the first place…How do you know she didn't do it for the conservations Reasons and to help he local tribes WITH FOOD? You are sounding more like the Antis more than anyone who supports it..And then to learn you've killed Yotes that you didn't eat after claiming you don't kill anything unless you eat it is might hypocrital, wouldn't you say?..Just call them the way I see them and you're not helping the hunting community you're just helping the antis with their distain for us even more by being critical of a young lady that did nothing wrong in the first place.BTW, is it wrong for farmers/hunters to kill groundhogs in the field because they may dig holes that hurt their livesstock? I do eat groundhogs but most don't and need them removed for good reason……What is the difference?

    Reply
  54. Chuck Naturale says:

    What is the difference between a hunter who donates the deer he kills and this girl ? You are way off target here Mike just because it isn't your cup of tea does not give you the right to attack her or her father I for one have saved for many years for a chance to go and hunt a problem elephant and the meat will feed a lot of people who would not have it except for people like me who are willing to pay for the chance of taking the hunt of a lifetime. My Mother use to say if you don't have anything good to say don't say anything.

    Reply
  55. … and still no apology form Mike Willand and/or Bowhunting.com for Mike's highly judgmental July 10th assessment of Kendall Jones reasons for hunting in Africa. Really?

    Reply
  56. Really Wade? Why would they need to apologize for an opinion piece? You don't agree that's fine but I would never apologize for my opinion ever.

    Reply
  57. Duffy Altermatt says:

    To the people that don't hunt, don't comment, If i were Kendall Jones parents i would consider your horrible comments bulling and i would make sure the FBI and Homeland Security had all of the information regarding your mis guided understanding of "hunting". I am disgusted with some people, here. If i have the means to hunt on a different Continent with my daughter i sure as hell would give a crap what you thought. Would you rather Kendall be out at the bar or worse abused, maybe some sort of sob story. hell no, this is a great story, this is a "winning" story, this is a positive story. And i am sad to see some people out there are making this out to be a "bad" or "unethical" story. All i have to say is, i am sad for you people that do not appreciate the "good" story.
    To: Kendall Jones family, "keep up the great work with your daughter and family" the Altermatt family wishes you well.

    Duffy

    Reply

Speak Your Mind

*