Coyotes Take Down Deer on Camera

By Brodie SwisherJuly 26, 20212 Comments

There’s no greater tool for capturing “unseen” images in the wild like trail cameras. These cameras have come a long way in the last decade and continue to be a tool that hunters rely on to capture the action while they’re away from the farm. 

There’s been some fascinating images captured on trail cameras over the years. There are some so crazy, you truly have to see it to believe it. But there are also plenty of brutal examples of survival of the fittest. 

Such was the case for Cassie Brown of West Virginia. Her trail camera recently captured the images of a pack of coyotes taking down a whitetail fawn. 

Check them out below…

Coyotes Take Down Deer On Camera
The first image captured shows a single coyote in the frame locking down on a whitetail fawn. (Captured by Cassie Brown)

Cassie Brown’s trail camera, set up over a mineral site, tells the story of a single coyote attacking and biting down on a whitetail fawn. 

Coyotes Take Down Deer On Camera
A second coyote makes his approach. (Captured by Cassie Brown)

You can only assume that the second coyote in the photo above heard the commotion and the desperation bleats from the fawn and made his approach to get in on the action. 

Coyotes Take Down Deer On Camera
One coyote watches as the other continues with its death grip on the deer. (Captured by Cassie Brown)
Coyotes Take Down Deer On Camera
Not to be left out, a third coyote joins in and begins to work on the lifeless deer. (Captured by Cassie Brown)

The final image shows a third coyote joining in on the action and making quick work of the fallen fawn. The second and third coyote both joined in within 2 minutes of the first image being captured.  

What about you? What’s the craziest thing you’ve ever seen captured on a trail camera? 

Comment below, and let us know what you’ve seen. 

Brodie Swisher
Brodie Swisher is a world champion game caller, outdoor writer, seminar speaker and Editor for Bowhunting.com. Brodie and his family live in the Kentucky Lake area of west Tennessee.
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