Broadhead Tuning Made Easy

Posted by: Dustin DeCroo on Jan 31, 2013
Page 1 of 2

There aren’t many things more frustrating to bowhunters than having erratic arrow flight or having to sight-in your field points and broadheads separately.  I would venture to guess that the majority of bowhunters will do two things after encountering the perceived annoyance of tuning an arrow rest: 1.) change broadheads from the ones they want to shoot, to the ones that fly the best or 2.) spend hours sighting their bow in for different tips made for different tasks.  Right now, I’m going to show you how you can eliminate these frustrations for the rest of your bowhunting career.

BROAD1

When it comes to getting comparable flight between field points and broadheads, a good deal of bowhunters experience nothing short of frustration. 

For the purpose of this article we are going to assume a few things. First is that your arrows are properly spined.  This means that the stiffness of the arrow is correctly fit to your draw weight, draw length and tip weight that you plan to use.  Secondly, we are going to assume that your rest has already been installed on your bow.  This is because most pro shops will do a “rough” tune when they set up the arrow rest, getting it close but not perfect in most cases.  There are many ways to tune an arrow rest such as paper tuning, bare shaft tuning, walk back tuning and broadhead tuning.  Because this is a bowhunting website and we are trying to get field points and broadheads to impact at the same point, we will discuss broadhead tuning.

Establishing  Differences

The first step is to figure out where your broadheads are impacting the target in relation to your field tips.  In general, field tipped arrows will fly more true because there is less wind resistance, while broadheads will magnify any imperfections in the flight of the arrow or the position of the rest.  To figure out the difference in impact points, simply shoot a two or three arrow group with field tips and then do the same with broadheads.  I prefer to shoot these arrows from 20 yards.  Keep in mind that whether or not the arrows hit where your pin was held is not important at this stage of the game.  I prefer to shoot my field tips at one spot on the target and my broadheads at another (this is just to decrease the chance of ruining arrows).  Take your time and make the best shots you can, if you feel like you made a bad shot, start over.  Also, if you feel like 20 yards might be too far to make quality shots, you can begin at 10 yards. 

BROAD1.5

 As you can see, my broadheads were hitting low and to the right.

Making Adjustments

Now that we know the difference between impact points, we can begin to adjust the arrow rest.  For my situation (broadheads impacting low and right) I adjusted my rest to the left by 1/64”.  I usually find it beneficial to adjust the rest left/right first and then vertically.  Adjust the rest by 1/64” increments until your broadheads are in line with the field tips up and down. Make sure to write down or mark your arrow rest in the position it was when you began in case you over adjust incidentally. 

 BROAD2

Adjust the rest by loosening the allen screw and lightly pushing the rest in the direction you need your broadhead tipped arrows to go.

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Dustin DeCroo

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4 Comments on "Broadhead Tuning Made Easy"

Re: Broadhead Tuning Made Easy #
Thanks for the tips :)
Posted by Greg on 2/6/2013 6:58:52 AM
Re: Broadhead Tuning Made Easy #
Your text says "broadheads hitting low and left" BUT the photo shows "Low and left". Are the rest movement instructions correct and this is the wrong picture OR do we need to move the rest to the "right" not the "left"??
Posted by Greg Callaghan on 2/19/2013 3:11:04 PM
Re: Broadhead Tuning Made Easy #
My mistake!! Sorry. Text says "low and right" picture is "low and left". are instructions backward?
Posted by Greg Callaghan on 2/19/2013 3:13:31 PM
Re: Broadhead Tuning Made Easy #
Greg, both the photo and text read "low and right" (if we are looking at the same place on the first page. The broadheads were shot at the white dot on the top left, not the same dot where the field tips were. Thus they are hitting low and right (of the impact of the field tips compared to the aiming point). So the proper adjustment would up and to the left.
Posted by Dustin on 4/4/2013 10:13:04 AM

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