Staying Warm

Posted by: PJ Reilly on Dec 3, 2012
Page 3 of 3


Outer Suits
The first day I hunted with a Heater Body Suit I thought I’d died and gone to heaven. The air temperature was 10 degrees, but inside my suit, I couldn’t have been toastier. A similar product is the IWOM. Basically, think of the Heater Body Suit and the IWOM as sleeping bags for hunting. You get inside them with all your hunting clothing on. The Heater Body Suit has legs, but no arms, while the IWOM has arms, but no legs.

The Heater suit has straps that hold it in place on your upper body. When it comes time to shoot, you unzip it, pull your arms outside and push the suit back behind your shoulders. Now, your arms and hands are free to draw and shoot a bow. The upper portion of the IWOM fits like a jacket, so shooting with it on is no different. Both suits roll up so you can pack them in to your stand or blind.

To really get the heat rolling inside your Heater Body Suit or IWOM, drop a couple chemical handwarmers into the bottom. You will be amazed at how much heat they will produce inside the suit. Heck, on one 20-degree hunt, I placed four handwarmers in my Heater suit, and, before long, I had to take off my jacket. It got too warm inside the suit.

Extras
You can buy chemical handwarmers just about anywhere these days. They even make large ones called “body warmers” that last longer and have more surface area. You can stuff these warmers in your pants and coat pockets, in your boots, in your hand muff – just about anywhere you want to produce heat. Just don’t leave them against bare skin for a prolonged period. You can actually burn yourself.
I once saw a guy on television that had his wife make him a simple jacket and pants out of a thin fabric, and she sewed little pockets all over both garments. When the guy went out hunting, he put a handwarmer in each pocket. He said he was nice and warm all day.

WRM5

Nothing says warmth like a big ol' sleeping bag made for hunting!

Tree stand hunters should always remember to bring a thick, padded seat on cold-weather hunts. Nothing will suck the heat out of your body faster than sitting on a bare metal seat. The pad is softer anyway, but the insulation it provides is more important during the late-season. Also, be sure to have a handkerchief. Your nose is going to run in cold weather. You’ll be surprised what it will do for your comfort just to get that liquid out. It’s better than wiping your nose on a glove or sleeve all day, leaving those items wet. Lastly, take some food with you. Digestion burns calories which creates body heat. Think of eating some crackers or a sandwich as tossing another log on the fire.

There are a lot of people who will think you’re nuts for heading out into the woods on a freezing cold day to sit motionless for several hours. To them, that’s a recipe for torture. Gear up appropriately, and it doesn’t have to be as uncomfortable as it seems. Besides that, when a big buck comes sneaking toward your stand, you’ll forget how cold it really is.

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2 Comments on "Staying Warm"

Re: Staying Warm #
A product definitely worth the money is ThermaCell's Heated Insoles wireless and rechargeable foot warmers. I was skeptical, but lets face it, chemical foot warmers do not work. These actually work, like a charm! The wireless remote lets you turn the insoles to med or high whenever you feel the cold come on. Plus, if they get too hot, just press the off button and let them cool down. The only draw back is that they are very hard and wouldn't be good for long hikes. Cold toes were my enemy causing me to leave the stand too early, but now I can hold out till hunger or my coffee kicks in! LOL Here's the link: http://www.thermacell.com/heated-insoles-foot-warmers
Posted by Scott on 12/6/2012 1:48:43 PM
Re: Staying Warm #
Ditto Scott on the therma cell insoles. They really work.
Posted by Larry on 12/13/2012 8:28:49 AM

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