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Shooting lanes

by Matt Cheever 23. January 2012 10:11
Matt Cheever

There seems to be two distinct schools of thought when it comes to pruning shooting lanes, most gravitate to one end or the other with a few folks hovering in the middle.  On the one hand you have guys that don’t like to cut anything they don’t absolutely have to, in fact these extremist at times won’t cut a single limb and just rely on the deer to step through a tiny opening at the moment of truth. You can probably tell by my description this mindset doesn’t include me.
The other school of thought is to make sure you have a clear shot with reasonable shooting lanes in any possible area the deer could travel through. The obvious down side is you open yourself up more to be picked off and you disturb the deer’s living room at some point. I tend to lean more in this direction but am cautious as not to open things up too much and ruin a stand site.


The ramifications of too much or too little are huge.  If you film your hunts like I do, you need to consider camera angle and not having to focus through a lot of limbs to capture the image; if you take too many limbs it leaves a huge hole that lends itself nicely as a focal point for the deer’s line of sight.  You want at least three good shooting lanes, preferably one to each side at an angle to your stand and another one straight in front of you. I realize many like to have their stand on the back side of a tree for concealment but this makes it very difficult if not impossible to film your own hunts.


An extendable power chain saw is very effective when you have many limbs or larger limbs to do prune 


Where is the fine line between these two you may ask? I have an approach that may take advantage of the best of both words.  Take some time during the late Winter months while out hiking or shed hunting and do your heavy pruning; you know that one big limb 20 yards out 18 feet up that always seems to be between you and the deer, take out a pole chain saw, extendable hand saw or even a small hand saw that you can duck tape to a sapling and get that limb down.  Do your massive pruning directly after season if you have determined to keep that stand site. There are three benefits, one is having less of an impact on the deer you are hunting, two is you will open things up but allow new spring growth to come back in and camo up your area a bit; last but not least you are putting more tree buds on the ground for the deer to browse, why not do it when they need food the most?


Don’t be afraid to use a large saw for nuisance trees in the winter months as long as the land owner doesn’t mind.

 


Doing this late season pruning isn’t a catch all, you will still need to pop a few little twigs out of the way come late summer or fall, but it will be with minimal disturbance. Late summer is a great time to slide in there and take a hand saw and quietly snag a few nuisance limbs. The perfect tool for small touch up or public land pruning where chainsaws may not be allowed is the Hooyman extending saw. This model reaches around ten feet, or can be used as just a hand saw, and folds up small enough to take on each hunt if necessary



I don’t personally like climbing stands but if I did, this would be a must have tool


I find there is always that one little twig that seems to cause most of the problems, but I have eliminated that by toting this aluminum I beam framed saw along with me


Get out in the woods during late winter and don’t let that one little limb or big limb keep you from your trophy next fall. You will be amazed how your success rate goes up once you take out the limb factor excuse.  Remember to be safe when using saws in trees and always have a safety harness on.

Until next time, be safe and God bless
Matt Cheever 

 

Categories: Bowhunting Blogs

Day One Update from the 2012 ATA Show

by Cody Altizer 10. January 2012 07:16
Cody Altizer

For me personally, there are a handful of exciting days that I look forward to every year as a bowhunter.  Obviously, opening day is one of those days.  The first cold snap that triggers daytime buck movement coinciding with rubs and scrapes appearing in the woods is another.  However, there is one day that I am very privileged and excited to experience every year, and that is the first day of the annual ATA trade show.

A shot of the hundreds of bowhunters at the Outtech party last night at the 2012 ATA Show.

Josh Kelley performing at the 2012 Outtech Party!

The show technically kicked off last night with the Outtech party.  Hundreds of industry dealers, writers, television personalities and bowhunting insiders flooded the convention center to enjoy some sneak peeks at new products, a live performance by country music star Josh Kelley, and of course to watch the Alabama Crimson Tide roll the LSU Tigers in the BCS National Championship game.  It was a perfect way to kick off an exciting week!

Let the festivities begin!

The floor rooms opened this morning at 8:30 and as soon as the gates opened, it didn’t take long for the industry business to begin taking place on the show room floor.  It’s pretty exciting to walk the floor and look left and right see the business being conducted.  You could feel the energy as business was being conducted left and right, new products were being revealed and hunting celebrities smiled candidly for photos and autographs.  

Perhaps what I look forward to most about the ATA Show is catching up and socializing with my hunting buddies that I may only see once or twice a year.  I know, I know I should probably be working and not socializing but hey, swapping hunting stories is just plain fun.  I was fortunate enough to catch up and chat with my pal Jason McKee of New Archery Products and Frank Archey of Lone Wolf Portable Treestands.  It’s always good to catch up and listen to other hunter’s success stories.  

I've always wanted to hunt mule deer and seeing this giant mule deer buck has only made me want to go even more.  Only at ATA!

In between working and socializing, I have been able to locate a couple of products that I especially excited about for the 2012 season.  The first was the 20 feet climbing ladder system from Lone Wolf Portable Treestands.  I’m a big fan of Lone Wolf’s climbing sticks, and this new ladder system looks fantastic.  The ladder stick system will get you 16 feet in the air in no time.  I spoke with Lone Wolf President Jared Schlipf about them and he assured me you could safely (with the aid of a lineman’s belt, of course) attach the ladder system to the tree, strap it down and be safely in your stand in 5 minutes.  This is a great product for the mobile hunter.  

Lone Wolf President Jare Schlipf in the middle of an interview discussing the new innovative Ladder Stick System.

I was also intrigued by NAP’s new Armor Rest full capture drop-away rest.  This little 5 oz. piece of engineering genius has a full rubber Armorshield on the body of the rest that stays whisper quiet in operation.  Titanium arms mean less weight, but added strength.  This rest promises full containment with 100% fletching clearance at any angle.  You’ll definitely want to check out this new rest from NAP!

New for 2012 the NAP Armor Rest.  If you're into full-containment drop away rests, then this is the rest for you.

The 2012 ATA Show is still very young, so be sure to keep checking the blogs to be the first to know about the cool new products for 2012.  

 

High Mountain Success

by Steve Flores 27. December 2011 06:08
Steve Flores

With so many rolling hills, food plots, and big buck sightings, it’s easy for an eastern guy to be a little jealous of his “mid-western” bowhunting brothers. After all, such particulars are seldom enjoyed in my neck of the woods. Still, the goal remains the same…..arrow a whitetail buck; plain and simple. So, in an effort to see that this goal is reached it is important that I keep my edge throughout the season. This includes not only my shooting form, but my body as well. Hunting whitetails in the rugged hills of southern WV is no walk in the park, and typically, one shot is all I get…if I’m lucky. Therefore, when the opportunity does arrive, I want to do everything in my power to close the deal. This begins and ends with “in-season” shooting, along with a steady dose of cardio and weight training.

So often, once the season begins, we find little time for shooting practice. However, it only takes a few arrows to keep shooting form and muscle memory intact. For me, this means sneaking outside the house to sling a few arrows whenever time allows; even if it is only one shot. This, by nature, more closely resembles real-life hunting scenarios; as opposed to haphazardly launching dozens of arrows into my 3-D target.

 

 It only takes a few arrows a day to keep muscle memory intact and shooting form polished. 

The season started out slow, which is typical of big-timber bowhunting, with little deer sightings. With so much territory to roam, it can be extremely difficult to nail down a good buck before the rut begins in November. Therefore, I usually keep a low profile and work the “fringes” of my hunting areas in an effort not to disturb the does before the bucks are actually on their feet cruising.

Early season can be a frustrating time for the big timber bowhunter. Patience is the best medicine for success. 

As November rolled around, I found myself perched in my favorite rut stand; located adjacent to a small doe bedding area, within a natural funnel. As the early morning sun broke through the dark grey clouds, I caught movement down the steep hillside below. Realizing that I was watching a buck cruise for does, I grabbed my grunt tube and let out a few soft “uurrppss” in an effort to get his attention. Watching him walk in the opposite direction I assumed my efforts had failed.

 Big Woods whitetails are like ghosts. If you encounter a good one consider yourself blessed.

Little to my knowledge, the savvy buck was simply using the terrain to his advantage in order to close the distance between us. Within minutes, the love-crazed whitetail was coming straight at me; grunting every step of the way. When he got within range I slowly brought my Mathews ez7 to full draw and waited for him to turn broadside. Just as he turned I settled the pin on my Trijicon sight high on his shoulder and stopped him with a mouth grunt; focusing on the single hair I wanted to split until the bow simply fired. The NAP Thunderhead Razor broadhead zipped through him like a hot knife through butter. In an instant he bolted straight away. However, his journey didn’t last long. Within seconds he was doing the “death sway” as he staggered and fell to the ground. Settling into my Lone Wolf stand I sat down and thanked God for the blessing I had just been given. 

The combination of an NAP Thunderhead Razor broadhead and NAP Quick fletch proved lethal.

The blood trail was nothing short of amazing!

 Nothing sweeter than High Mountain Success!

The following week, I filled my second archery tag on another mountain whitetail. This particular buck was caught cruising through one of my favorite hunting spots. What makes it so special is that it is located in a ridge top saddle, next to a bedding thicket, and is loaded with oak trees that drop acorns like rain. When the rut is on, or any time of year for that matter, it is dynamite spot to arrow a deer. Also, it should be noted that this buck was shot with the same NAP Thunderhead Razor that I took my first buck with. After simply re-sharpening the blades, the broadhead was just as deadly as it was the day it came out of the package. But don’t take my word for it. See the blood trail below and decide for yourself.

 Same NAP Broadhead....Same result!

  The combination of quality gear, a lot of patience, and Blessings from above, made this a great year. Happy Holidays! 

 

Hanging Deer Stands and Glassing for Velvet Bucks

by Cody Altizer 23. July 2011 15:24
Cody Altizer

This coming fall will be my seventh season bowhunting for whitetails, and I have learned quite a bit about the sport during that time, and still have a lot to learn.  One thing I have learned is that there are no certainties in the whitetail woods.  That being said, however, I have come to expect a peak in anticipation for the upcoming season during mid to late July, and this year is no different.  While the recent country wide heat wave will do it’s best to prove otherwise, I feel the onset of autumn more and more with each passing day.  Fortunately, I was able to spend a couple days on my property in Virginia last week prepping for the quickly approaching season.


I was excited about the possibility of pegging a potential shooter this fall while glassing a couple weeks.  Unfortunately, all I saw was does.  Maybe next time!

 My trip home was short lived, so I had to make the very most of time in the woods.  I arrived in Virginia during the middle of the afternoon on Wednesday the 13th, and immediately went glassing for bucks.  I have permission to glass and shoot photos on a neighboring property, so I made the quick drive down the road and set prepared to enjoy a hot summer afternoon.  The evening came and went with no bucks spotted.  I did, however, see 10-15 does feeding the hayfields I was glassing, but they were a good 300 yards away and I wasn’t able to snap any photos or record any video.  Alas, such is life!


I was able to snap a photo of this doe as she effortlessly jogged through the tall grass.  I was particularly offended by her taunting me by sticking her tongue out at me as she ran to safety.  Hopefully, this won't be a recurring theme this fall!

The next day, also my last day home, would be spent hanging stands.  I had 5 Lone Wolf stands I wanted to get hung, and was able to get all 5 of them hung in a day’s time.  I was pretty proud of myself, but I have been hunting this piece of property for what will be my 16th season, so I know my away around the woods pretty well.  Now, if I could just figure out how to kill these mountain bucks; but, I digress.  After I hung my stands and got my shooting lanes trimmed out, I wanted to check on my food plots.  If you have followed my blog and Bowhunt or Die episodes throughout the offseason, you know how excited I have been about a particular clover food plot and its impact on my hunting this coming fall.  Well, I must admit that the key to my success was taking a hit as of a week ago, and is likely in even worse shape as we speak.  July has been an abnormally hot and dry month in Virginia, and what was once a thick, green jungle of clover is quickly getting eaten to the ground by the deer and burnt up by the heat.  There is still a good bit of clover, and given the conditions it has provided a nutritious and consistent food source all summer, but it sure could use a drink of water!  You hear that Rain gods?  I am talking to you!


My Lone Wolf stand sitting in a tree between a bedding area and a clover food plot; how many more days until opening day?!

After an exhausting day hanging stands and looking over my food plots, I was anxious to get home and check the trail cameras I had placed over my Monster Raxx minerals.  To my disappointment, I only had shooter buck visit the minerals, but it looks as if he will be quite a dandy.  The photo was snapped in mid-June and he was already a main frame 10 with some junk around his bases and something funky growing on his right main beam.  I am hoping to get another picture of this buck and hopefully have the chance to put my tag on him this fall!

My clover went from this...

... to this, all in a matter of two months!  It really is amazing what a lack of rain can do to your food plots!

Unfortunately, my trip home was short lived.  I really had only one goal while I was home, and that was to get my stands hung without disturbing the deer too much; a goal I feel I accomplished.  I will be returning to Virginia in a few short weeks so I can begin work on my fall food plots.  Then after that, all that is left to do is continue shooting my Mathews and count down the days until the season starts.  I am sure I say this every year, but I have literally never been more excited about a hunting season than I am this one.  I can’t wait to document my entire season on video and through photography, so be sure to follow my blogs throughout the season.  God Bless and happy hunting everyone!


With a little over two months remaining until the opening day of Virginia's archery season, all I have left to do is a little food plotting, and a lot of dreaming, particularly of this big boy!  October 1st, October 1st...

Lone Wolf Portable Treestands Best Treestand for Bowhunters

by Cody Altizer 20. June 2011 05:51
Cody Altizer

Struggling for a good introduction to my next blog, I went downstairs, grabbed the star of the aforementioned blog, and went outside looking for inspiration.  I had barely made it out of my garage when I thought to myself, “Who am I kidding?  I don’t need a witty introduction for this piece of equipment and the message I want to get across, this product just plains works.  This is going to be a meat and potatoes blog about a meat and potatoes piece of gear.”  Ladies and gentlemen, I present to you the simplistic effectiveness of Lone Wolf Portable Treestands.

Admittedly, I had never hunted out of a Lone Wolf stand until last fall.  Filming and hunting alongside admitted Lone Wolf addicts Todd Graf and Justin Zarr, however, opened my eyes to a whole new world of bowhunting; one of increased success and more shot opportunities at bucks.  One hunt out of a Lone Wolf Assault Hang On taught me that if I wanted to be a more successful bowhunter, I needed to go after the deer, rather than waiting for them to come to me.  Aside from my bow, a Lone Wolf stand, when teamed with Lone Wolf’s lightweight and packable climbing sticks, is the most important piece of equipment in my arsenal of gear.  

Lone Wolf Portable Treestands allow today's bowhunter to hunt, well, like a wolf.  Their stealthy design and ease of use provides hunters with endless options when hanging stands.

I’ve learned quickly in my 5 years of bowhunting that whitetails rarely follow the script that I’ve laid out for them.  For whatever reason, shooter bucks just don’t like getting as close to me as I like getting close to them.  When hunting animals as instinctive and intelligent as a whitetail, it is important to remain flexible and be willing to make adjustments on the fly.  Lone Wolf stands make this an extremely viable option.  

This is especially true in the mountains of Virginia where I will spend the majority of my hunting time this fall.  Bowhunting for mountain bucks is a craft that I haven’t quite figured out yet, and one that has led to a lot of frustration in recent years.  I’ve seen my fair share of 3.5+ year old bucks in the thick pockets of timber on my hunting property, but never have I been able to get in bow range of one.  Confined to clumsy ladder stands, or bulky hang-ons and steel ladders, I admitted defeat as I knew changing my position with one of these stands would be time consuming and cause such a disturbance that I would likely never see that buck again period, let alone get a shot at him.  That will not be the case this fall.  I’ll have the majority of my stands hung by the end of this month, but I’ll keep an extra Lone Wolf and climbing sticks at the ready.  This will allow me to effectively ambush bucks without their knowing of my presence.

The extreme lightweight design of Lone Wolf stands allow hunters to "run n' gun" when bowhunting.  Having a light and easy to carry treestand is especially beneficial when hunting mature mountain bucks like I do.

 One Lone Wolf stand will give me endless options in the woods because of their stealthy design and extreme ease of use.  They are so easy to use, in fact, that I feel comfortable hanging a Lone Wolf stand in the middle of the night.  This may sound crazy; however, it could provide you with your only opportunity at a buck, especially a mature buck.  It is important to remember to be safe when hanging treestands, and don’t do anything you aren’t comfortable doing.  Always wear a linesman’s belt when hanging your stand and sticks, and always wear a safety harness while in stand.  No buck, no matter how big, is worth risking your life over.  I recommend that every hunter practice hanging their treestands in the offseason.  This will help you become more comfortable in hanging treestands and may prevent injury in the future.

The secret to Lone Wolf’s complete line of treestands is their exclusive, one piece, cast aluminum platform that provides superior strength, stealth and durability.  These platforms are solidly built so they give the hunter the safety and assurance we all look for in the tree, while being so deadly silent that is almost impossible to make noise when standing on the platform.  Other stands may sound like a bowl of Rice Krispie cereal in the stand- snapping, cracking and popping, but not a Lone Wolf.  

The secret to Lone Wolf's genious engineering is their one piece, cast aluminum platform.  This platform is solid as a rock, yet quiet as a field mouse.

I’m also proud to remind everyone that Lone Wolf has brought the production of their treestands back to America.  This is welcomed news to the hunter who wants to support the struggling American economy by spending their hard earned money on a product they know is a being manufactured right here at home.  The best treestands in the world are again being manufactured in the best country in the world!  What could be better?

Lone Wolf stands are again being fully manufactured in the United States of America!

Bowhunting for mature whitetails is a game of chance, and we as hunters must do everything we can to tip the odds in our favor.  Some hunters practice scent control religiously to avoid a whitetail’s extraordinary sense of smell.  While others invest time, effort and money into planting gorgeous looking food plots to concentrate deer to certain areas to better their odds.  Granted, these are great techniques and strategies that have allowed many a hunter to harvest many a whitetail, however, sometimes they just aren’t enough; some whitetails are nearly impossible to kill.  This is when the lightweight, durability and ease of use of Lone Wolf Portable Treestands can give you the opportunity at bucks you otherwise would not have been able to kill.

 

To learn more about Lone Wolf and their complete line of hunting products, visit their new website here.

Bow Review-Mathews eZ7

by Steve Flores 1. May 2011 09:06
Steve Flores

While a good deal of attention is being placed on the flagship Z7 Extreme, and rightfully so, it would be a mistake to overlook the other bows in the Mathews stable, more specifically, the new eZ7.  Without question, this is the smoothest bow I have ever had the pleasure to shoot.  Not only that, it is also deadly accurate.

 The eZ7 cam may look similar to systems of the past, but when combined with today’s technology, it becomes an essential part of an entirely new killing machine.

At the heart of the eZ7’s buttery smooth draw cycle is the cam system. This system is similar to that used on the DXT series of bows from years passed. Anyone who ever shot those bows can attest to how pleasant they were to pull back. However, don’t be fooled into thinking this is simply the “rehashing” of old technology. When you combine this cam system with the new Gridlock Riser, a slightly longer ATA than the original Z7, and the Reverse Assist Roller Guard, what you get is an amazingly quiet, super smooth bow that spits out arrows fast enough to kill anything that walks the planet. 

 Perfect balance best describes the Mathews little “e”.

And, while speed is a good thing, it doesn’t come free. Most often you must sacrifice drawing comfort and brace height. The trick when choosing a new bow is to find one that balances speed and accuracy. The Mathews eZ7 is a perfect example of discovering this balance point. With a 7” brace height and an IBO seed rating of 321, one could justifiably ask “what more could you want in a hunting bow?”

 Tight shooting situations prove no problem thanks to the effortless drawing motion of the eZ7.

Out of the box the eZ7 proved to be exactly what I expected. With very little time behind the string I opted to take it with me on a recent hunt in Kansas for wild turkey. Reaching full draw without being detected was easy because there was no need for excessive movement just to get the string back. This bow can be drawn without the common “point to the sky” movement I see from a lot of guys shooting aggressive speed bows. And, at my 70lb draw weight, which feels more like 60, it packed plenty of punch for long beards (or anything else standing downrange).

My new Gold Tip Pros held up exceptionally well to this 40-yard nock busting hit.

As I mentioned, the eZ7 is accurate. This point really hit home when I recently found myself busting nocks while sighting in a forty yard pin on a new sight I was testing. Results like that, this early into my pre-season warm up, really builds confidence.

 

 With plenty of options to choose from, you can customize your next Mathews with special colors schemes and weight options to suit your own style of shooting or hunting.

The addition of a second “Harmonic Stabilizer” adds weight to my rig which I like very much. While a good deal of bowhunters opt for a lightweight rig, I think heavier bows hold steadier at full draw and fight bow torque much better than featherweight setups but…..to each his own. 

Test drive this bow before making a final decision no matter what brand you may be considering.

Without a doubt, there are some amazing products coming out of Sparta, WI. But, take my advice and give each one a fair chance. If you do, I think you might just find a surprise or two…..I know I did. For me, the Mathews eZ7 is the ideal blend of speed, accuracy, and quiet shooting personified.

 

 

 

Armchair Whitetail Scouting

by Steve Flores 21. March 2011 13:16
Steve Flores

Flying under the whitetail radar, while effectively locating your next trophy from the comfort of your own home, is actually easier than it sounds using these three steps.

Record Books
They may not have the glitz and glamour compared to other methods used to uncover whitetail hotspots, but don’t kid yourself regarding their value.  If properly utilized, record books are the next best thing to someone actually telling you where the whitetail hotspots are located.  You see, most individuals are reluctant to reveal their exact whereabouts when they experience any type of consistent success; especially when hunting on public land, and without a doubt if the animal is of Pope and Young caliber.  However, upon entering their trophy into the record books, they must at least divulge the general area of the harvest.  And that is where this entire process begins. 

Another good source of information is your local taxidermist. They are witness to a large variety of bucks and usually know the exact details of the kill. (i.e. harvest data: time, date, location)

Searching through the most recent edition of P&Y records will ultimately tell you (among other things), where the best bucks is being taken.  Finding a hotspot is as easy as calculating the total number of entries for any given county within the state you are researching.  Obviously, when you find a county that is consistently producing a high number of record class bucks, then that is where you will most likely want to concentrate your efforts.

Topo Maps
When using the lay of the land as a guide for stand placement, whether you’re in an entirely new spot or on very familiar hunting ground, the first thing you need to do is realize there are 2 types of terrain features….Positive and Negative.  Both will influence deer movement.  Your job is to utilize the clues found on your topo map to determine which types your area holds and how the deer are going to respond to them.  Then, act accordingly.

 

Don’t dismiss the amount of information contained in a topo map. Take your time and study one of your area before actually walking in on foot to further investigate.

When looking at your map, try to find negative terrain features that funnel deer movement into a pinch point.  For example, a small drain possessing steep side-hills that eventually turn into gradual slopes near the top is an excellent illustration of how negative terrain can funnel and influence deer movement.  Ideally, any deer moving through the area will most likely cross near the top, where the slope is not as radical.  An actual observation of the land should reveal heavy trails at the top which will coincide with the “widely spaced” contour lines from your topo map. For the most part deer are lazy and will often take the path of least resistance; as long as it provides them with the safety needed to get from point A to point B. Use this behavior to your advantage when thinking about possible stand locations.

Positive terrain features on the other hand will include, but not limit themselves to: ridge-top saddles, shallow creek crossings, overgrown logging roads, bench flats, and/or gradually sloping hollows.  In the past, I have set up in saddles discovered using only a topo map and long range observation, and struck pay-dirt my first time in the stand; mainly due to a bucks tendency to use a low lying saddle when crossing over a ridge in order to prevent sky-lining himself. 

Scouting Cameras
You should already have a good idea about where you are going to hang your camera based on the info (lay of the land) gathered from your maps.  Within that chosen area, consider setting up your camera near recently discovered “pinch points”.  Ideally, you’ll want to be set up in high traffic areas; somewhere near bedding/feeding locations or along the transition routes in between. However, if you are unfamiliar with the locale, it may take a little more investigating to discover such places.

 

Scouting cameras are your eyes when you are not there. Set them up in the right locations and they can pay off in a big way.

  Not only can game cameras reveal travel patterns of target bucks known to frequent your area, they can also provide evidence of NEW bucks that have moved in for any number of reasons. 

While conducting your search, look for heavily used trails leading to pinch points that choke deer movement into a confined area; increasing the likelihood that you will capture useful images.  Remember though, that the overall goal is to remain under the whitetails radar, so try to conduct your camera hanging/scouting before the season starts.  Also, do your best to get the camera location right the first time in order to avoid disturbing the area any more than what is absolutely necessary.  If you have thoroughly studied your maps, it shouldn’t be a problem.

Finding a good location to hang your treestand will be much easier having followed these three tips......

and the rewards will be well worth it!

Conclusion
Locating your next trophy without tipping your hand can be difficult to say the least.  However, with a little more homework, and a lot less footwork, you can accomplish far more than you thought possible.  Remember to utilize the information found in record books and harvest reports to get you headed in the right direction.  Then, obtain a topographic map of the area and study it as if your life depended on it. Lastly, go in and hang a scouting camera based on positive and negative terrain features and see if your hunch was right.  My bet is you will be going back very soon to hang a stand. Good luck and God Bless!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lone Wolf Treestands - Back in the USA

by John Mueller 17. January 2011 12:25
John Mueller

The title and this poster pretty much says it all. Lone Wolf Tree Stands are once again 100% made in the USA. To say they learned their lesson by shipping production outside the US would be and understatement. I was assured at their booth, that will never happen again. It wasn't easy but the company did survive the disaster of 2010. And they have made some nice improvements to their stands for 2011. Those of you who were unable to get one of their stands last year. Rest assured they will be on store shelves everywhere again this year. The guys at Lone Wolf just hope you will trust them again to produce a quality product and buy their stands with confidance.

They are hoping this symbol will once again mean the top of the food chain when it comes to tree stands.

They did a complete remake of the cast platform and in the process improved the built in bowholder. They incorporated a cast hook into the platform that catches in the cam of your bow, holding it directly out in front of you at arms length. No reaching around the side to take your bow off the holder screwed into the tree. This holder was designed to work especially well with todays parallel limb bows.

Three different styles of stand make up the Lone Wolf line up. This includes the hang on shown above with the bow in the holder, the sit and climb immidiately below and the hand climber in the bottom photo. All of the Lone Wolf stands are some of the lightest in the industry and pack extremely small for transporting through the woods. Lone Wolf also makes a great set of climbing sticks that stack neatly together and attach to the hang on stand for packing in.

The guys at Lone Wolf hope you can forgive them for the mistakes of last year in an ever more competitive industry and give them another chance. They really have learned their lesson on what it takes to produce a quality product. Instead of being made 6000 miles around the globe, they are now produced in their own backyard, 6 miles from the company headquarters in Peoria, Illinois  USA. A real hometown made product. I believe the new model is even better than the previous ones with the new bow holder.




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