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Day 6 PlotWatcher Pro- NEW for 2011!

by Bow Staff 3. February 2011 01:58
Bow Staff

2011 Day 6 PlotWatcher Pro

The original Day 6 PlotWatcher time-lapse video camera was a game changer no doubt, but the new PlotWatcher Pro hits it out of the park. With four times the battery life and a 2.5" LCD for on-board camera set-up, video aiming and camera status messages, the PlotWatcher Pro will put you that much closer to getting that trophy buck you so desire.

The PlotWatcher Pro is not a traditional trail camera. In fact, traditional trail cameras with time-lapse features pail in comparison to the PlotWatcher Pro. There are three very important design criteria for a time-lapse camera -- long battery life, the ability to support tens or hundreds of thousands of images and good picture quality in low light conditions without a flash. This is because some of the most important scenery for a timelapse camera is happening right at dawn or dusk, out of reach of a flash.
 
Traditional trail cameras are optimized for large megapixel counts, continuous motion detection and energy-efficient flashes. The design choices to make a good quality trail camera are simply not the same design choices to make a high quality time-lapse camera such as the PlotWatcher Pro.

Like the original PlotWatcher, the PlotWatcher Pro uses time-lapse video technology to record high-definition images taking a picture every 5 or 10 seconds and saving these individual pictures as an HD video. So whether the animal is 30 feet away or 330 feet away, you'll see them on the video. Essentially, the PlotWatcher Pro records what you would have seen if you'd been scouting that same spot for all of that time.

In addition, the PlotWacher Pro accepts add-on zoom lenses, features temperature and moon-phase info on each image, uses an SD card storage, is security cable ready and saves video files in ½ of the memory space. It also features defined time-of-day for video start and stop.

The GameFinder video player software, free with the PlotWatcher Pro, gives you the ability to watch an entire 12-hour day's worth of video in just a few minutes.

To learn more about this new PlotWatcher Pro take a look for them on the web.

 

Categories: Current News

BuckScore Download will take the Guessing Game Away!

by Bow Staff 29. July 2010 16:08
Bow Staff

Expect BuckScore to score points with deer hunters!

Ever sit on your PC late at night studying the images of countless bucks you captured on camera? Ever wonder what each buck scores? Sure you can guess. Sure you could have a friend guess. But wouldn’t it be great to really know? Read below and STOP the guessing game.

Introducing BuckScore, a downloadable program developed by two professors from the Mississippi State University’s Deer Ecology and Management Lab, along with a graduate-researcher, over a three year period. Using known measurements for average deer ear widths, eyeball widths, and measurable facial features such as the eye-to-eye distance, these researchers developed equations to assess the antlers in inches using the Boone and Crockett scoring system.

BuckScore can even estimate the antlers' inside spread, main beam lengths and gross score simply from photographs. And is accurate whether the antlers are in their summer "velvet" or hard-horned.

Simply upload a buck’s digital image into your PC and use the tracing tool to outline the antlers. Within moments hunters will get an accurate estimate of the antlers total score!!

Without BuckScore this hunters estimate was off by less than one-inch! With it, he decided the buck was big enough to take after all! Thanks BuckScore!

BuckScore Pro is expected to be available as a $10 download at their website before the Labor Day holiday. It is expected that a percentage of the sales will go to Mississippi State University, and 25% of that will go specifically to its deer research lab. BuckScore is also teaming up with Bushnell scouting cameras to allow a free download with purchase of some of their products.

While the software will first be offered for Windows-based computers only, a Mac version will shortly follow. A BuckScore application is even in the works for both iPhones and iPads and is expected to be available this January.

So take the guessing game out of your favorite trailcamera photos, or just bust the chops of your co-workers and friends. Look for the BuckScore download and start telling the truth about what you really saw!

 

Categories: Bowhunting Blogs

Introducting the Moultrie Game Management System

by Todd Graf 7. August 2009 04:08
Todd Graf

Introducting the Moultrie Game Management System — a camera, GPS cellural accessory and web site system that allows you to check your cameras from the comfort of your office.

 




Pattern and scout game anywhere in the world.
The Moultrie Game Management System gives you 24/7 access to your hunting land. It's simple really, our three part system – camera, GPS cellural accessory and web site – literally connects you to your game camera. Our latest I- and M-Series cameras bring innovative options, clarity and a new level of data management to your hunt. When connected to the cutting-edge GPS Game Spy Connectiong cellular accessory, you can instantly transmit images to your own, password-protected page on Moultrie's game management web site. Even better, members can access their private web page from anywhere inthe world that has an internet connection.

 

 

Clarity, covertness, control — a new series of cameras takes your hunting to the next level.
Not ready for the system and web site? Not a problem. Our four latest I- and M-Series camera models can be used with or without the complete Game Management System. The new I-Series cameras have been upgraded to include truly invisible infrared technology, while the new M-Series give you the ability to capture color night video. The 65-Series offers up to six mega-pixels, with four picture resolution and two video resolution options. Each new camera boasts a faster trigger time to ensure immediate game capture. All models com in a easy-to-operate LCD menu display that shows batterly life and activity summary.

Scout big game with a mouse.
Once inside your private access page at www.moultriegamemanagement.com, you can easily sort and search images by time, date, moon phase, temps or barometric pressure, create albums and galleries of your images, and even plot and view your camera locations using GPS coordinates – all with the click of your mouse. Plus, you can control the settings on your camera without ever leaving your chair – switch from still to video mode, check battery levels, and more from any internet connection.

Moultrie brings a new window to your hunting world and it's open 24/7. Get all the details of the new Moultrie Game Management System at www.moultriegamemanagement.com.

We're always scouting for ways to make your hunting experience more enjoyable and successful.

The Moultrie Game Management System.

Categories: Current News

Moultrie Launches New Game Spy Camera System

by Todd Graf 11. January 2009 05:35
Todd Graf

Providing Complete Access to Camera Location 24/7 Alabaster, Alabama – January 2009 – Moultrie announced the launch of the Game Spy Game Management System, which offers complete access to game cameras via cellular network and internet. Consisting of three components – camera, cellular modem and web site – the Game Management System provides complete access to game cameras 24/7, from the comfort of your own home.  

The Camera

Moultrie’s introduction of a complete camera system also brings to the market four innovative scouting cameras that are compatible with the Game Management System. Choose from the Game Spy I-45 and I-65 models with truly invisible infrared technology, or the Game Spy M-45 and M-65 white-flash models with color night-time video. Each game camera boasts a quick trigger time and long battery life, so you’ll never miss a shot. Moultrie’s 2009 game cameras retail $279.99-$379.99. 

The Cellular Modem

Game cameras are addictive, but the cost of checking them every weekend gets expensive. Moultrie’s new GPS Game Spy Connect modem plugs directly into compatible Game Spy cameras, giving you the ability to access your camera whenever and wherever you please. Through AT&T’s cellular network, you can wirelessly transmit images, check battery status or even change your camera setting – all from your computer, PDA or cell phone. The GPS Game Spy Connect retails for $149.99. 

The Web Site Moultrie’s Game Management web site offers members a private-access web page to manage photos, data and cameras anywhere in the world, from any computer with internet access. Once signed up, members can also enter accounts remotely from most cell phones or PDA’s with internet capabilities. Upload images captured at your favorite hunting spot, keep an eye on your property, plot and view locations of game activity using GPS coordinates, control your camera from miles away . . . the possibilities are nearly endless! Monthly plans start at $29.99. 

Moultrie’s complete Game Management System will be available summer 2009.
 

 

 

 

 

Categories: Current News

Deer Hunting Scrapes - It Won't Be Long Now!

by John Mueller 27. October 2008 13:50
John Mueller

IT WON”T BE LONG NOW

  

            The scrapeing is going on strong at my place in IL right now. I found a hot scrape last weekend and set my Moultrie I40 up on it. I was pleasantly surprised this weekend by the results. I got pics of a quite a few different bucks using it. Most of the big guys were at night but that may change in a week or 2.

 

            Here is a pic. of a real nice 10 pointer I had an encounter with 2 weeks ago right at dark. I had him at 40 yards but couldn’t see my pins. At least he is still around.

 

 

The Big 10

 

I got a few action shots of the bucks with their antlers in the branches too. I may have to change the I40 over to the video mode. It has that option built in.

 

I can almost reach it.

 

 

Giving it a thrashing.

 

 

 

 

         Another visitor. 

 

 

Big bodied 8 pointer.

 

 

            If you’re interested in putting a trail camera on your own scrapes, you can order yours right here on Bowhunting.com. Check out the trail cam section

  

Moultrie I40 Trail Camera Review

by John Mueller 29. September 2008 12:52
John Mueller

I put 2 Moultrie I40's into use almost a year ago and have been very impressed with the results. That is after I updated the software. It seems there was some type of glitch in the cameras originally. They would produce a whiteout image when in the IR mode on some pictures. After downloading the update from the Moultrie website onto the SD card and then loading it in the cameras my units have performed very well for me.

The Moultrie I40.

 

The daytime pictures are some of the clearest I have seen from a trail camera. The 4 megapixel camera produces very sharp images.

2 turkeys in my food plot.

A doe in the plot.

 

The one feature I have mixed reviews on is the IR Mode of the camera. It was one of the reasons I had originally bought the camera. To get away from the flash going off in the woods and possibly scareing the deer. This model uses Infrared Illumination to capture lowlight and nighttime photos. A band of 72 IR bulbs glows red to take the lowlight pictures. These photos are black and white images.

 

 This is not supposed to spook deer. I do catch some of them stareing at the camera while it is taking their picture. The bad part about this is it takes a lot of daylight to get the camera off of the IR mode. When my camera is in the woods 90% of the pictures are IR mode even in daylight. The only way I get color daylight pictures is to have my camera on a food plot or open field. The black and white images are great for just cataloging your deer and seeing what is out there. But if you want to frame some of the photos or show them off on your favorite website, the color pictures work much better.

Some of the neat features of this camera are:

1. 3 different still picture settings for picture quility.

2. 2 different video settings. (which I have to figure out so I can put my camera on some scrapes this fall)

3. Uses SD Cards, which most digital cameras use now. I use my camera to view them in the field.

4. A laser aim pointer to adjust where the unit is pointed.

5. Time, Date, Temperature, and Moon Phase stamped on the picture.

6. Uses 6 D-cell batteries that last a reported 150 days. I have had mine in operation for almost 1 year and am on my second set of batteries( still have 65% charge)     Truely extended battery life.

7. Easy to set up and reset after checking.

Nice and simple to operate, not a lot of switches or buttons.

8. Does the scouting when you're not there.

Some things I would like to see changed:

1. The SD Card is in a very awkward place to get to. Unless you have very long skinny fingers. There are many other places this could have been put.

Here you can see the SD Card just to the left of the white label.

2. The unit is a big black box. A grey or softer color would not stand out nearly as much. Harder for the deer and would be thieves to see.

3. No real way to lock it to the tree.

4. It does make a bit of a click when the shutter opens.

All in all I have to say the pluses far outweigh the minuses on this camera. I am very happy with the service my 2 units have given me in the year I have had them. No problems at all after doing the original upgrade to the software. And I have not heard of another unit with the battery life of the I40. If you would like to try one of these out for yourself. They can be purchased right here on Bowhunting.com by following the link below.

Predator Evolution Digital Trail Camera

by Bowhunting.com Staff 26. September 2008 15:32
Bowhunting.com Staff

Predator Evolution Digital Trail Camera

With the advent of digital cameras and their increase in popularity it wasn’t long before the first digital trail cameras hit the market.  Over the past several few years we’ve seen and used a lot of trail cameras that weren’t worth the packaging they were shipped in.  At one time it basically got to the point where we had so many problems and issues with trail cameras that we nearly stopped using them altogether.  We’ve had constant battery issues, confusing set-ups, and countless wasted trips into the field to retrieve cameras that hadn’t even been working.  Anyone who has been through this painstaking process can surely relate.

When we first heard about the Predator Evolution camera the touch screen user interface was what caught our eye.  While we work in front of computers and use technology on a daily if not hourly basis when it comes to trail cameras and anything we bring into the field; simplicity is king.  We don’t want to read  a complicated instruction manual in order to use a trail camera.  In the past, some of us had actually written cheat sheets to use in the field when trying to set up certain cameras.  This isn't exactly fun.

We’ve now been using our Predator Evolution cameras for the past few months and will give you the straight forward product review that you deserve.  After all, that is what Trailcam.com is all about.  Providing straight forward, unbiased opinions of trail cameras and trail camera accesssories to help you, the consumer, make better purchasing decisions.

Overall Design and Impressions

The guts of the Evolution are housed inside of a compact and waterproof polycarbonate case.  This is the same material they use to make bullet-proof glass!  The case is very similar to many of the high quality camera cases that are used by professional photographers to protect their camera equipment.  The Evolution's case is unbreakable and won’t crack like many of the other trail cameras that use a cheaper ABS plastic housing.  When you are paying good money for a trail camera the last thing you want is for the case to break or crack, allowing moisture into the unit which can destroy the electronics.   Speaking of which, all electronics in the Evolution are tightly packed behind the LCD screen with only a single visible “On-Off” switch visible when the case is open.  The entire unit is very small in size, which we love.  Big, bulky, heavy cameras are not only a bigger pain to carry around the woods but also present a larger target for deer, and theives, to spot.

The Evolution has one of the most impressive fit and finishes of any camera we’ve seen or used.  From the touch screen to the large secure latch this camera has been built right.  Our only real complaint is the storage of the batteries.  Predator uses a battery pack that holds 10 AA batteries.  This is somewhat loose inside of the provided holding area and could be improved, but it works fine as-is.

The user interface of the Predator Evolution is extremely easy to use and well designed.  The only problems we encountered were during cold conditions when the screen became slow and at times almost unresponsive.

Setup & Ease of Use

When we first received our Predator Evolution trail camera we opened the owner's manual, and found very little information about how to use the camera.  We loaded it with batteries, turned the unit on (with the very simple “on-off” switch), and quickly realized why.  It has quite simply some of the easiest and most straight forward controls we’ve ever seen.  The first time we had ever seen, used, or turned the camera on we had it completely set up in a matter of 2 minutes.  It was beyond simple and actually enjoyable to set up, unlike many of the cameras we've tested over the years.

The huge 3 1/2 inch touch screen does what it was designed to do.  It puts all of the information in a very organized list.  You can very simply access all the functions and settings by scrolling through the options with the arrows located at the bottom of the screen, and by using “Enter”.  Every function and/or setting is very simple to understand and clearly spelled out for the user.  Even someone who has never set up a trail camera in their life should be able to figure this camera out in a matter of minutes.

When looking at the ease of use of a camera the most important thing we want to know when we're walking away is that it is working properly and we won’t return to find an empty card.  There's not many things in the November woods that can send us off into a furious tyraid than checking a trail camera that we've had over a hot scrape for the past 7 days only to find out it hasn't been working.  And believe me, we've had this happen more times than we'd care to admit (and I'm sure we're not the only ones).  The Predator Evolution does what it’s supposed to, with very little possibility of not turning it on or not setting it up correctly.  When you flip the switch to the "On" position there is no further action needed to make sure this camera is going to take photos.  Simply close the case and walk away.

Functionality

The Evolution allows the user to choose between video clips or still photos.  The video is a great feature for those who are looking to get the best possible look at an animal from multiple angles.  However, beware that this camera is extremely sensitive so you may end up with video clips of birds, squirrels, raccoons, and other small animals as well.  Also, if you are going to use this camera in video mode your best success will come in areas where your quarry is in a stationary position for a few moments.  Places like food plots, mineral sites, scrapes, and wallows work the best. 

Images and video are stored on either a Compact Flash card or mini-USB drive.  Both formats work well and for those of you who may have a stash of Compact Flash cards already this shouldn't be a problem.  However, we would like to see added functionality for accepting more widely-used memory sticks such as SD in the future.  Compact Flash cards seem to be getting harder and harded to come by, and certainly aren't coming down in price.   The cheapest card we could find at a local retail store was $45 for a 2.0 GB card, compared to $25 for a 2.0 GB SD card.

The Evolution is an infrared nighttime illuminating camera.  This means there is no white flash for your night time photos or video clips which could potentially scare game.  We’re not going into any further detail regarding the infrared other than it works great.  Distance is good, anything within pretty much 15-20 feet is illuminated very well.  Beyond that, like any other camera, it has its limitations.

Picture Quality

The picture quality and video quality of the Predator is probably middle of the road.  We’ve seen higher quality photos from different systems, but this isn’t something we always consider a top priority.  Generally speaking, we're not blowing our images up and making posters out of them.  We are using them to gather information on what types of animals are on a particular piece of ground.  The images and video we’ve gotten through our Predator cameras are good, but could certainly be improved on.   Infrared images are occassionally washed out and excessively grainy.  It would be nice to see this improved in future product releases.

Still photos from the Evolution are 2.0 megapixel color images during the day, and 1.3 megapixel black and white images at night.

Trigger Speed

The trigger speed of the unit is excellent.  It’s as fast or faster than any other trail camera we’ve  used.  Predator advertises a trigger speed .15 of a second and although we have not gotten our stopwatches out and tested this, it certainly seems fast to us. It also has an adjustable sensitivity level from 1 to 9 depending on the size of the game you're after, and the conditions that you're using the camera in.  This is a nice feature to have because we have set up cameras in certain areas where a blowing leaf or corn stalk has used up both our memory card and batteries before it could take any real pictures. 

Battery Life

Although battery life could certainly be improved upon, the interchangeable battery pack is handy for quick changes in the field.  Here you can also see the rubber o-ring on the inside of the case that creates the water tight seal when closed.

Battery life of the unit is OK, but could certainly be improved.  Like most of the trail cameras on the market when the cold hits the life of the batteries go downhill fast.  In warm weather we have had units last for up to a month.  In cold weather the length of operation drops dramatically, sometimes lasting only a few days.  The Predator is not nearly as bad as some units we've tested and with the use of rechargeable batteries it’s manageable, however this is one area we would like to see improved in the future.  AA batteries are not exactly cheap so if you have multiple units and it gets cold things can get expensive in a hurry.  Especially when you're chewing through 10 AA batteries at a time.

Mounting and Security

The Evolution uses a separate mounting bracket that is secured to the tree first and then the camera is placed on the bracket.  This is a great little feature that not many other companies have thought of.  A heavy duty mounting pin is then put through the rear of the camera unit to mount it onto the bracket.  Predator offers additional mounting brackets for additional functionality and versatility.

In order to secure your camera Predator offers a cable locking mechanism and also features a 4 digit security code which makes the camera effectively worthless should anyone steal it.  Trail camera theft is an unfortunate reality in today's woods and it's nice to know the guys at Predator are doing their best to help prevent it.

Final Thoughts

Of all the cameras we’ve seen and used, we believe that the user-friendliness of the Predator Evolution makes it an excellent choice for anyone.  It has some great features that go beyond many other similarly priced cameras out there and because of the great touch screen interface we believe it is a hard trail camera to beat.

Please keep in mind that the Predator Evolution has many features and benefits that we haven’t even gotten into.  This review has been based on the features that are important to us. 

Categories: Pro Staff



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