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ATA Show Day 2 Live Update

by Cody Altizer 11. January 2012 06:53
Cody Altizer

Day 2 of the 2012 ATA Show is well underway here in Columbus, OH and I can say with full confidence two things: there are some seriously cool products hitting the shelves for 2012 and my legs are painfully heavy and sore.  But, what the heck, it’s all worth it, because it’s all fun!  I’ve been busy running around gathering information for future posts and articles, e-mailing photos back to the Bowhunting.com headquarters, and the minute this blog is posted I’ll be back on the show room floor, so I hope you enjoy the photographs!

New for 2012 is the Lone Wolf Wide "Flip-Top" Climber Combo.  I just recently purchased a Lone Wolf Sit and Climb for this past hunting season and was thrilled with it, so I am excited about possibly using this stand this fall.  Where I hunt in Western Virginia, it's predominantly big woods mountains with a lot of mature pole timber.  Often times, hunting from a climber is my best bet at getting high enough to avoid the wary eyes of the whitetail.  The Flip Top Climber Combo functions like a climber in every regard except the seat, which looks like it belongs on a hang on.  This feature gives hunters more room to position themselves on the platform for a shot.

Yesterday I was drooling over a world record Mule Deer.  Today, a world record moose caught my eye.  What a giant, beautiful animal!  Who wants to plan a mule deer / moose combo hunt with me?!

Pine Ridge Archery is offering several accessories in custom colors allowing hunters to completely trick out their bow in 2012.  There are numerous possibilities and options that allow you to make your bow look truly unique.  Pine Ridge Archery really hit a home run with this line of products.

I've always enjoyed the Rocket Broadheads commercial on televisions, you know, the one with the giant chainsaw lined with Rocket Broadheads.  It's visually appeaking and I think it does a fantastic job of selling the effectiveness of Rocket Broadheads.  Nevertheless, when I saw the real life version of the vicous machine, I had to take a photo.

I find myself faced with quite the dilemma: shoot the new NAP Armor Rest or the New Apache Carbon?  I've shot the Apache for two years now and am excited about this new lightweight, carbon design (4 ounces is a featherweight!) but the new Armor Rest looks pretty cool as well!  Help!  Someone decide for me!

Bowhunting.com is well represented both at the NAP booth...

...as well as the Stealth Cam / Epic Action Cam booth!

I'll leave you with an image I found pretty funny.  I happened by The Block Target Booth while filming John Dudley doing a commercial spot.  It sounded like a pretty simply commercial, but John kept repeating his name over and over again (multiple takes to get the perfect shot, of course), but I just couldn't help but laugh and feel sorry for him.  Here he was, standing in front of a camera, with lights beating on his face, and he was asked to repeate his name over and over while a substantial crowd simply watched.  Talk about awkward!

The show is still going strong and out staff guys are hard at work getting photos and information to releases on the site as quickly as possible so you can be the first to hear and read about the new products for 2012.  Check back often because you don't want to miss out on the upcoming updates and photos!

Illinois Doe Down! Bowhunting Dream Come True

by Cody Altizer 4. October 2010 09:40
Cody Altizer

When Todd Graf offered me the opportunity to move to Northern Illinois and work at the bowhunting.com office, I jumped at the chance to live and breathe bowhunting in the Mecca of the whitetail world.  Growing up as a young boy in Virginia I dreamed of hunting giant Midwestern whitetails.  I watched with envy as the “pros” flocked to Illinois to chase trophy deer.  I even joked with my friends back home, “I’m going to move to Illinois one day just to bow hunt monster whitetails.”  This past weekend, I found myself living a dream come true.

Click here to watch the footage of my doe harvest!


    Friday afternoon, October 1st, I climbed a tree for the first time bowhunting the state of Illinois.  With temperatures in the upper 60s and gusty winds, I honestly didn’t expect to see much deer movement.  I didn’t care.  I was just thrilled to be in the stand with a bow!  I was positioned in a narrow strip of timber that connects a bedding area and a standing corn field.  It was an ideal setup on paper, unfortunately, the afternoon passed without a single deer sighting.  Again, I could not have cared less.  I had a blast in the tree with my video camera recording the unfamiliar yet beautiful scenery and snapped several photos with my still camera as well.  I was going to capture every aspect of my first Illinois deer hunt.  As the evening passed and the sun began to set, I realized just how blessed I was to be living a dream.

 This shot gives you an idea of just how much fun I was having in the tree!

    I chose to sit out the Saturday morning hunt as I had several chores around my apartment that took top priority.  I elected to go to a different piece of property for the afternoon hunt, a piece that holds tremendous potential for big bucks as the fall progresses.  I quietly snuck into my stand downwind, strapped down my camera arm and got settled in for a promising afternoon hunt.  The weather was perfect for an early season bow hunt, albeit a little breezy.  With temperatures in the mid 50s and steadily dropping into the 40s as the evening progressed, I was certain I would see some activity.  Again, I was beat by the way of the whitetail; another hunt in Illinois without seeing a deer.  While in the stand Saturday afternoon I was texting back and forth with my brother and dad who were hunting the archery opener back home in Virginia.  After telling my brother, Damin, I had been skunked for the second straight hunt, he proceeds to tell me of the 15+ deer sightings he had throughout the day and the numerous encounters he had with young bucks.  To make matters worse, he tells me of the active scrape line he finds leading to one of our turnip food plots and the bountiful acorn crop on our hunting property.  I jokingly told him, “Forget Illinois, I am coming home!” 

My first Illinois bowhunt as a member of the bowhunting.com team was a memorable one, one that concluded with a gorgeous sunset.

     With opening weekend in Illinois almost over and without a single deer sighting, it was tempting to double my chances by hunting both the morning and evening on Sunday.  Still, chores around the apartment and responsibilities outside of hunting took top priority, so I slept in and opted for another afternoon hunt.  I headed back to the same piece of property I hunted Saturday, but hunted a different stand.  Justin Zarr and I hung this stand a little more than a week prior to Sunday feeling good about our chances from this location, so I was optimistic.  While aimlessly crossing an open cattle pasture, I spotted my first Illinois animal, a coyote feeding underneath a crab apple tree.  My initial reaction is, “Awesome, my first deer sighting!”  Further inspection reveals the problem animal that is the coyote.  Back home, coyotes, while present, lack the numbers of the packs in the Midwest.  In fact, I had only seen a handful of coyotes in my life prior to Sunday, so I took the opportunity and captured some quality footage.  At just 45 yards, it surprised me that he was completely unaware of my presence.  Sure, I was downwind, but I was in the middle of an open field.  As I began to film the pesky predator, he starts walking directly toward me, closing in at 30 yards.  I then realize that I might actually be able to shoot this thing.  With my camera in my right hand and bow in my left, I desperately try to get my bow prepared for a shot while simultaneously putting down my camera.  Just as I was about to set my camera down, the coyote spots me, not 20 yards from where I am standing and takes off in the opposite direction.  Excited to have finally seen an animal, let alone a close encounter with a coyote, I contently make my way to my stand.

 

A shot of my special edition bowhunting.com Quikfletch.  Little did I know that just hours after this photo was taken, my Quikfletch would turn a bright, solid red!

    Once in my stand, I prepare to strap my camera arm to the tree to get settled in for the evening hunt.  As I secure my camera arm and begin to get my video camera situated, I spot movement to my left; the coyote is back!  This time he makes his way by my stand at no more than 15 yards.  Unfortunately this time, my bow was still tied to the rope at the bottom of the tree.  Adding insult to injury, he sits down quite happily and scans the cow pasture he just came from.  Furthermore, he decides now might be a good time to relax and lies down on his belly.  So, for the second time in less than 10 minutes, I have a coyote at 20 yards or less and am unable to take a shot.  Realizing I have little to lose, I slowly try to raise my bow up the tree.  Of course, being just 15 yards from the base of the tree he spots my movement and boogers off, this time for good.  After finally getting settled into the stand I determine that the afternoon hunt will be a success regardless if I see a deer or not, based solely on the two encounters with the coyote.  Still, I remained hopeful for my first Illinois deer.  
   As the hours passed without seeing a single deer, I remained entertained by the numerous squirrels that scurried about searching for acorns and hickory nuts and decided to do a quick interview.  Just as I got my camera turned around I see a big doe right over top of my camera lens at just 25 yards and making her way towards my stand.  Before I know it she is at 10 yards from my tree and all I have managed to do is get her in frame on my camcorder.  She wastes little time and is now 3 yards from the base of my tree before I take a chance at turning around and grabbing my bow.  Fortunately, she breaks left and with her back to me I am able to stand, grab my bow and position the camcorder ready for the shot.  Now, I just need her to take a couple steps down the trail for a perfect 10 yard quartering away shot.  As she makes her way down the trail, I draw.  She flips the script, turns back broadside and is looking directly at me.  I quickly settle the pin behind the shoulder and release the arrow.  THWACK!  The sound all bowhunters love to hear indicating a true hit.  I watch her tear through the underbrush out of sight.  My NAP Thunderhead Edge struck true and proved devastating as I could see blood spilling from both sides.   Feeling confident in my shot I make a couple phone calls letting my family and Todd know of my luck.  After waiting 30 minutes I get down from my stand, quickly find my arrow, pick up the blood trail and wait for Todd to arrive to film the recovery footage.  Just like that, in less than 30 seconds, I see, film, shoot at, and harvest my first Illinois whitetail, an old, heavy, mature doe!  I was pumped to say the least and amazed at how big she was compared to the deer back home.  Regrettably, we didn’t weigh her, but I would estimate the doe to field dress 130 pounds, maybe bigger.  She was huge!

 One happy hunter!  My first Illinois whitetail was a big, mature doe, a deer that I am extremely proud of.

My first bow harvest on film.  Self-filming can be difficult, but I had a blast in the tree with my camera and now I can relive this memorable hunt forever.

Opening weekend in Illinois resulted in a big doe down for this Virginia boy.  Despite my opening weekend fortune, the weekend would have been would have been a success had I not seen a single deer.  Realizing that I was living a dream come true made every minute in the tree enjoyable.  Being blessed with a beautiful mature doe was just icing on the cake.  With the entire season ahead of me, I can now focus all of my attention on harvesting a mature buck and filming other members of the bowhunting.com team.  Regardless of my luck the rest of the fall, I can look back at opening weekend to remind myself just how fortunate I am!

Gear Relied on During the Harvest:  Click on the red link to purchase the item right here on bowhunting.com


NAP Thunderhead EdgeI was excited to use the new Thunderhead Edge this year and I wasn't disappointed.  This broadhead flies true and leaves gaping entrance and exit wounds.

NAP Apache Arrow RestI love my Apache rest.  The minute I installed it on my bow and began shooting I noticed a quieter shot and tighter groups.  I'll be using the Apache for a long, long time.

NAP Bowhunting.com Quikfletch:  The entire Quikfletch line makes fletching arrows a breeze. 

The special edition bowhunting.com series simply look cool, I prefer all white.

Blacks Creek Bone Collector 1.5 Backpack:  The Bone Collector 1.5 is the ideal pack for hunters who carry a lot of gear but do not want to be slowed down in the woods.  I carry all of my cameras and equipment in my pack and don't miss a beat sneaking through the woods.

G5 Optix LE .019A great hunting sight.  It's rock solid and adjustments come easily.  Like the Apache, this will be in my arsenal of gear for a very long time.

NAP Apache Dropaway Arrow Rest Review

by Justin Zarr 14. June 2010 03:04
Justin Zarr

Every year there are hundreds of new archery accessories that hit the market and cause many archers to drool over their computer monitor, tv screen, or favorite bowhunting magazine.  Some of them are fancy with new electronics and technologies while others are simply a new take on a proven product.  The NAP Apache arrow rest falls into the later of the two categories.  This rest isn't fancy, but it just may be one of the best new products for this year.

The Apache is one of the most solid arrow rests I've ever used, and appears to be built to withstand just about any amount of punishment that your typical bowhunter can dish out.  As I get older it's this exact type of rugged dependability that I'm looking for in my bowhunting products.  Sure, flashy and complicated looks cool but it doesn't always help you shoot more animals.


I replaced the cable on my Apache to match my string loop.  It comes with a brown cable from the factory.

Two main features of the Apache are the full-capture arrow "cage" that's built around the rest, and the tool-less adjustments.  The top-loading cage built around the rest provides nearly 360 degrees of security which means your arrow can't fall off the rest (or out of it) unless you tip your bow completely upside down.  The inside of the cage is lined with a foam pad and the launcher comes with a felt pad pre-installed so it's completely silent, which is a must for bowhunting.

Tool-less adjustment provides quick and easy setup and adjustments in the field or at the range.  Once you bolt the Apache onto your bow you won't need another allen key until you're ready to take it off.  With a bow square and laser adjustment tool I had the rest lined up and tightened down in a matter of minutes.


The Apache is built extremely well and has both horizontal and vertical graduations to help you make the proper adjustments when tuning your bow.

All in all the new Apache rest appears to be a great rest for all bowhunting purposes.  The tool-less adjustments provide quick and easy setup while the cage provides full-capture containment with the benefits of full fletching clearance.  A rugged and dependable rest, the Apache should fit the needs of almost any bowhunter.

If you're interested in more information about the NAP Apache arrow rest, visit www.newarchery.com.




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