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NAP Spitfire Gobbler Getter Broadhead Review

by Dustin DeCroo 15. March 2012 08:57
Dustin DeCroo

New Archery Products has built a solid reputation around designing and building top of the line archery products. NAP produces the oldest, most trusted fixed blade head of all time, the Thunderhead; and arguably the most reliable mechanical broadhead on the market, the Spitfire. Technology continues to progress in every aspect of life and the broadhead industry is no different. Welcome, Spitfire Gobbler Getter.


New Archery Products Spitfire Gobbler Getter

Bowhunters have long since discovered the advantages of mechanical broadheads for hunting turkeys and in 2011 NAP created an expandable broadhead designed specifically for turkey hunters. The Spitfire Gobbler Getter is a variation of the already proven Spitfire broadhead.  The expandable turkey broadhead is available in 100 or 125 grains, has a 1 1/2" cutting diameter and over 3" of cutting surface.  Similar to the original Spitfire, the Gobbler Getter integrates Micro Grooved Slimline Ferrule technology to allow air to pass over the ferrule with less resistance, thus, providing the truest arrow flight possible. The Diamize sharpened blades are sharpened through a rigorous process ensuring exceptionally sharp blades to produce the cleanest cuts for maximum hemorrhaging and quicker kills. The blades on both the Spitfire and the Spitfire Gobbler Getter are locked into place with a hidden blade tension clip that NAP guarantees will not allow the blades to open in flight. Finally, the radical change that transforms the Spitfire to the Spitfire Gobbler Getter is the shock inducing Gobbler point, a rounded tip in place of the hardened Trophy Tip. The sole purpose of the Gobbler tip is to minimize pass throughs, delivering the most shock possible into the gobbler. Why would anyone not want a complete pass through? Let us take a harder look.

Turkeys are tough birds, period. There is no arguing that fact. There are a couple of significant differences between turkeys and other big game animals that bowhunters pursue. The first being, turkeys have the ability to fly away after they are shot. Obviously, this creates its own, set of problems. Second, blood trailing a turkey can be extremely difficult because they don’t have much blood to lose and feathers can soak up the majority of your blood trail before it reaches the ground. For these reasons, the idea behind the Gobbler Getter is to put the bird on the ground where he stands or shortly thereafter, before he has the opportunity to fly. This is achieved with the combination of a large cutting surface and by the Gobbler point helping the arrow expend its energy in the bird. This delivered “shock” works the same way bullets deliver shock or “knock down power” to an animal.



The Gobbler point is designed to deliver shock in the same manner a bullet delivers "knock down power."

Let us be honest. Every broadhead on the market today will kill a turkey if the arrow is placed correctly. This holds true with deer as well. Every broadhead on the market will kill a heart shot deer. Unfortunately, I don’t make a perfect shot on every animal. My theory on broadheads, is that I don’t buy a broadhead for the perfect shot. I buy a broadhead that provides me the best chance of recovering my animal on a poorly executed shot. For this reason, my quiver was loaded with NAP Gobbler Getters in the Spring of 2011, and will be again in 2012.

In preparation for bowhunting turkeys, I practiced shooting my Z7Xtreme at distances out to 70 yards strictly to test the flight of the Gobbler Getter. The Gobbler Getter tipped arrows were flying like darts, at any distance, off the string of my Mathews. The Merriams and Rio Grande turkeys of the Western United States were kind to me, providing me the opportunity to take a total of five toms with the Gobbler Getter broadhead in the Spring of 2011. The NAP broadheads performed exactly as they were designed putting birds down on the spot on multiple occasions. My bow is set up with a 29 inch draw length at 70 pounds and I’m shooting a 413 grain arrow at 286 feet per second. That’s a significant amount of kinetic energy to be stopped in something as small as a turkey. While my arrows did pass through, they were all lying on the ground where the bird stood or were sticking with the fletchings straight into the air, thus, the energy was delivered to the bird instead of the dirt on the backside. On one particular bird in Wyoming, I made a shot that was higher than expected but the large cutting surface and cutting diameter allowed the shot to be fatal and the bird was recovered within 75 yards. 


These big Mearriams gobblers were two of the first toms to fall to my Spitfire Gobbler Getter broadheads.

The main criteria I have for selecting a broadhead are: true flight, sharpness, durability and performing in the manner they were designed (i.e. turkey shots, turkey head shots, or ultra penetration on large game). If we’re talking about a mechanical broadhead, I want the blades to open when and only when they strike the target, not in the quiver or on their way to the target. There are numerous quality expandable broadheads on the market but if you are looking for a five star turkey specific broadhead, I recommend giving the Spitfire Gobbler Getter a chance at taking down your next tom.

 

ATA Show Day 2 Live Update

by Cody Altizer 11. January 2012 06:53
Cody Altizer

Day 2 of the 2012 ATA Show is well underway here in Columbus, OH and I can say with full confidence two things: there are some seriously cool products hitting the shelves for 2012 and my legs are painfully heavy and sore.  But, what the heck, it’s all worth it, because it’s all fun!  I’ve been busy running around gathering information for future posts and articles, e-mailing photos back to the Bowhunting.com headquarters, and the minute this blog is posted I’ll be back on the show room floor, so I hope you enjoy the photographs!

New for 2012 is the Lone Wolf Wide "Flip-Top" Climber Combo.  I just recently purchased a Lone Wolf Sit and Climb for this past hunting season and was thrilled with it, so I am excited about possibly using this stand this fall.  Where I hunt in Western Virginia, it's predominantly big woods mountains with a lot of mature pole timber.  Often times, hunting from a climber is my best bet at getting high enough to avoid the wary eyes of the whitetail.  The Flip Top Climber Combo functions like a climber in every regard except the seat, which looks like it belongs on a hang on.  This feature gives hunters more room to position themselves on the platform for a shot.

Yesterday I was drooling over a world record Mule Deer.  Today, a world record moose caught my eye.  What a giant, beautiful animal!  Who wants to plan a mule deer / moose combo hunt with me?!

Pine Ridge Archery is offering several accessories in custom colors allowing hunters to completely trick out their bow in 2012.  There are numerous possibilities and options that allow you to make your bow look truly unique.  Pine Ridge Archery really hit a home run with this line of products.

I've always enjoyed the Rocket Broadheads commercial on televisions, you know, the one with the giant chainsaw lined with Rocket Broadheads.  It's visually appeaking and I think it does a fantastic job of selling the effectiveness of Rocket Broadheads.  Nevertheless, when I saw the real life version of the vicous machine, I had to take a photo.

I find myself faced with quite the dilemma: shoot the new NAP Armor Rest or the New Apache Carbon?  I've shot the Apache for two years now and am excited about this new lightweight, carbon design (4 ounces is a featherweight!) but the new Armor Rest looks pretty cool as well!  Help!  Someone decide for me!

Bowhunting.com is well represented both at the NAP booth...

...as well as the Stealth Cam / Epic Action Cam booth!

I'll leave you with an image I found pretty funny.  I happened by The Block Target Booth while filming John Dudley doing a commercial spot.  It sounded like a pretty simply commercial, but John kept repeating his name over and over again (multiple takes to get the perfect shot, of course), but I just couldn't help but laugh and feel sorry for him.  Here he was, standing in front of a camera, with lights beating on his face, and he was asked to repeate his name over and over while a substantial crowd simply watched.  Talk about awkward!

The show is still going strong and out staff guys are hard at work getting photos and information to releases on the site as quickly as possible so you can be the first to hear and read about the new products for 2012.  Check back often because you don't want to miss out on the upcoming updates and photos!

Day One Update from the 2012 ATA Show

by Cody Altizer 10. January 2012 07:16
Cody Altizer

For me personally, there are a handful of exciting days that I look forward to every year as a bowhunter.  Obviously, opening day is one of those days.  The first cold snap that triggers daytime buck movement coinciding with rubs and scrapes appearing in the woods is another.  However, there is one day that I am very privileged and excited to experience every year, and that is the first day of the annual ATA trade show.

A shot of the hundreds of bowhunters at the Outtech party last night at the 2012 ATA Show.

Josh Kelley performing at the 2012 Outtech Party!

The show technically kicked off last night with the Outtech party.  Hundreds of industry dealers, writers, television personalities and bowhunting insiders flooded the convention center to enjoy some sneak peeks at new products, a live performance by country music star Josh Kelley, and of course to watch the Alabama Crimson Tide roll the LSU Tigers in the BCS National Championship game.  It was a perfect way to kick off an exciting week!

Let the festivities begin!

The floor rooms opened this morning at 8:30 and as soon as the gates opened, it didn’t take long for the industry business to begin taking place on the show room floor.  It’s pretty exciting to walk the floor and look left and right see the business being conducted.  You could feel the energy as business was being conducted left and right, new products were being revealed and hunting celebrities smiled candidly for photos and autographs.  

Perhaps what I look forward to most about the ATA Show is catching up and socializing with my hunting buddies that I may only see once or twice a year.  I know, I know I should probably be working and not socializing but hey, swapping hunting stories is just plain fun.  I was fortunate enough to catch up and chat with my pal Jason McKee of New Archery Products and Frank Archey of Lone Wolf Portable Treestands.  It’s always good to catch up and listen to other hunter’s success stories.  

I've always wanted to hunt mule deer and seeing this giant mule deer buck has only made me want to go even more.  Only at ATA!

In between working and socializing, I have been able to locate a couple of products that I especially excited about for the 2012 season.  The first was the 20 feet climbing ladder system from Lone Wolf Portable Treestands.  I’m a big fan of Lone Wolf’s climbing sticks, and this new ladder system looks fantastic.  The ladder stick system will get you 16 feet in the air in no time.  I spoke with Lone Wolf President Jared Schlipf about them and he assured me you could safely (with the aid of a lineman’s belt, of course) attach the ladder system to the tree, strap it down and be safely in your stand in 5 minutes.  This is a great product for the mobile hunter.  

Lone Wolf President Jare Schlipf in the middle of an interview discussing the new innovative Ladder Stick System.

I was also intrigued by NAP’s new Armor Rest full capture drop-away rest.  This little 5 oz. piece of engineering genius has a full rubber Armorshield on the body of the rest that stays whisper quiet in operation.  Titanium arms mean less weight, but added strength.  This rest promises full containment with 100% fletching clearance at any angle.  You’ll definitely want to check out this new rest from NAP!

New for 2012 the NAP Armor Rest.  If you're into full-containment drop away rests, then this is the rest for you.

The 2012 ATA Show is still very young, so be sure to keep checking the blogs to be the first to know about the cool new products for 2012.  

 

New Bowhunting Products From the Mathews Retailer Show

by Dustin DeCroo 16. December 2011 12:02
Dustin DeCroo

We visited the 2011 Mathews Retailers show to check out some of the new products that will be available in 2012. While we don’t have time to review every new product, here are a few that caught our eye! More prooduct reviews will be released next month following the ATA show in early January.


Easton Injexion Arrows:
Easton introduces the Injexion and A/C Injexion arrows for 2012. The Injexion is an entire arrow/insert/broadhead system developed from the ground up by Easton and New Archery Products. The Injexion arrow is an ultra-micro diameter arrow that is second to none in crosswind performance, downrange kinetic energy and arrow penetration on big game animals. Deep Six inserts have been designed specifically for this arrow as it is smaller in diameter than it’s older brother, the Easton Axis. The Deep Six inserts have a different thread pattern than the 8-32 conventional thread, and NAP is exclusively producing the broadheads to fit these inserts. An RPS insert with conventional threads will be available as well. If you are looking for a high performance, super tough, small diameter arrow take a look at the carbon Easton Injexion and the A/C Injexion arrows.

Easton Injexion arrows tipped with NAP Deep Six broadheads will most likely fill my quiver this Fall.

Brunton Hunting Epoch Binoculars:
Brunton Hunting of Riverton, Wyoming continues the Epoch line of binoculars for hunters. The Epoch’s were the winner of the 2011 Best Buy award for binoculars by Inside Archery Magazine. Two models are available, the full size and the compact. The full size binoculars are available in 8.5 and 10.5 power with 43mm objectives and the compact binoculars are offered in 8 and 10 power with 21mm and 25mm objectives. The Epoch binoculars have a lightweight magnesium frame, are nitrogen filled fogproof lenses and are waterproof. Both black and camouflage models are available. SF prism glass allows for some of the best light transmission on the market for glassing in low light conditions. Brunton’s Epoch binoculars are backed by a limited lifetime warranty.

The Brunton Epoch binoculars are worth a look-through

Armortech Vision Sight by Axcel Sights and Scopes:
Bringing new technology to a mark that asks, “what more can be done?” The new Axcel Armortech Vision offers a new 2” housing for optimal view of your target. It brings new meaning to “seeing is believing!” The Armortech Vision also contains the innovative T.C.V (True Center Vision), a perfect circular picture, even when viewed slightly off center. Continuing the tough as a tank attitude found in the original Armortech, the same engineering is back with a vengeance in the Vision. The 3-time “inside archery” best buy award winner still features A.F.T. (Armor Fiber Technology) 100% fiber protection, 2nd and 3rd axis adjustment, interchangeable right and left hand capabilities, individual micro adjustment on each pin, engraved partial ring at the depth of the sight pins, for greater accuracy when viewed slightly off center. The Armortech Vision is available in popular models that include the Mathews Harmonic Damper, as well as the ever popular Pro Series with the micro adjustable dovetail bracket. The Vision is available with 4, 5 or 7 pins in .010”, .019” or .029” fiber size. The Armortech line of sights leave nothing to be desired when it comes to a top of the line hunting sight and it appears this trend will likely not change soon.

The Armortech Vision sight is built to withstand severe abuse

Mission Riot Bow by Mathews:
Mission archery introduces the Riot in their 2012 line of bows. The riot is 31” axel-to-axel and sports a 7” brace height which makes it a very forgiving bow. Unlike many bows, the Riot will fit 90% of archers right off the shelf as the draw weight adjusts from 15-70lbs on a single set of limbs and the draw length is adjustable from 19-30” on a single set of cams. The bow incorporates a Dead End string stop installed at the factory for improved feel and vibration dampening. The Riot is perfect for young archers that will grow as the bow with “grow” with them. At a retail price of $399 it will be difficult find a bow that provides more value for your dollar than the 2012 Mission Riot.

The New 2012 Mission Riot


Hardcore Max Release by Trufire:
The Hardcore MAX adds two new features to the already popular Hardcore line of releases. A screw located in a housing behind the trigger will adjust trigger pressure (separate from travel) anywhere between 3 ounces to 16 ounces. Also new is the comfort enhanced Evolution II buckle which will have 2.5 times thicker padding as well as a slightly wider strap profile. The Hardcore line of releases incorporate an open jaw, hook style release which makes for super easy D-loop engagement. The head of this release also pivots horizontally up to 20 degrees to ensure that there is zero torque on your bow from the release. These releases are available in Black or Lost Camo and the Hardcore Max is available in Black. Both of these releases are American Made.


Hardcore Max Release by Trufire

Q&A With the Pro's: Mechanical and Fixed Blade Broadheads

by Justin Zarr 13. December 2011 09:27
Justin Zarr

One of the hottest topics in the archery world is mechanical broadheads, I don't see this subject cooling down in the near future. I discussed mechanical broadheads (and fixed blade broadheads) with Chris Kozlik of New Archery Products, here is what he had to say...

New for 2012, the Deep 6 broadhead family has been engineered for small diameter arrows such as the Easton Injexion.

 

Q: The most common knock on mechanical broadheads seems to be that their blades open in flight, causing the arrow to fly off target which results in either a miss or a lost animal. What do you think about that?

A: Modern bows are certainly pushing the envelope on speed. Crossbows even more so. Having the blades on a mechanical head stay closed during flight is critical to hitting your mark. We’ve done extensive testing to make sure our heads work perfectly and stay closed during flight with the fastest equipment on the market. It’s easy to test. Hang a piece of paper in front of your target and shoot thru it. You should have a small hole, that shows the blades stayed closed. If not, it’s time to go find a better mechanical head.

Blades that open in flight are one of bowhunters major concerns in regards to mechanical broadheads.

 

Q: When it comes to shooting whitetail-sized game is there anything to be concerned about when shooting a mechanical broadhead?

A: Even though mechanicals have been on the market for over 20 years, there are still myths that revolve around the use of mechanical heads. Three statements seem to come up in conversation more than any others. Specifically, “You can’t take an angled shot with a mechanical” or “It takes too much energy to open the blades / a mechanical won’t penetrate well” or “My broadhead didn’t open!” I’d like to address these one at a time.

First off, any correct angled shot that you would take with a fixed blade, you can take with a mechanical. There are no additional restrictions. 45 degree quartering shots are no problem. Angles steeper than that and you risk the shot, mechanical or fixed blade, period. Three years ago, I received an email from a happy Spitfire customer who took such an angled shot that he cut 8 ribs clean thru and still had a full pass thru. I still have the pictures. Understanding that this shot should never have been attempted with a bow and arrow, it nonetheless proved to me the effectiveness of a full mechanical head even on a steep angled shot.

About blade opening and penetration, I’ll take that question in two parts.

Our mechanical heads use very little energy to open. The resistance that you feel by slowly opening a blade by hand simply isn’t there when the head slams into a target. I routinely demonstrate this by shooting a Spitfire thru a piece of cardboard using nothing more than a draw length check bow with a draw weight of 3 pounds. Blades will open every time. Now imagine a hunting arrow going 250 feet per second (which is 170 miles per hour!) with 60 pounds of kinetic energy. Even a modest 45 pounds of kinetic energy will cleanly kill any big buck out there with any well designed mechanical.

The biggest obstacle to getting a full pass is not the broadhead on the end of your arrow, but how well that arrow was flying as it hits the target. Any side to side whipping or porpoising of the arrow , either from a poorly tuned rest or string slap on your hunting clothes, will cause drastic reductions the penetration power of the arrow, regardless of the broadhead you choose. A bad flying arrow at close distance is even worse than one shot at longer distance because the vanes have no chance whatsoever to recover or get that arrow flying properly. In just the last few days I’ve had 2 bow setups, one being my own personal bow, which shot excellent field points at long distance (my first 50 yard robin hood) and still had a barrel rolling arrow coming out of the bow. Had I just installed a broadhead and gone hunting, the results would have been, regrettable. It’s easy to blame the broadhead when something goes wrong and in a lot of cases, the broadhead had nothing to do with the poor results. Take the time to tune your setup to perfection before stepping into the woods.

“My broadhead didn’t open,” is one of the biggest fear some people have of shooting a mechanical head. In the closed position, all of our heads are still angled partially open. In the 15 years that we have produced the Spitfire, we have never had a head that didn’t open. Like pushing on a door handle, the door has no choice but to pivot around its hinge and open. Now, what has tricked a few people along the way is that the blades may slam shut if the head goes thru a deer and into the dirt. Also in practice, if the head pops out the back of a target and the arrow stays in the target, the blades will again rocket forward and slam shut. In all cases, the head will show a little dent where the back of the blade whacks into the edge of the ferrule. It’s a witness mark that happens even on lower poundage bows. You can test this by taping a piece of paper on the back of a target block and shooting thru. Three large slots will be left in the paper. Even withdrawing an arrow from a deer or foam target will fold the blades closed again. On a yearly basis, I will receive one or two suspect heads where a customer believes it didn’t open. I’ll take a head that’s full of fur, dried blood, and dirt and shoot it as-is. The head will open perfectly! A few years ago, I shot a doe in Seneca, Wisconsin, quartering away at 20 yards with the first Spitfire Maxx prototype. The doe went downhill and out of sight. When I retrieved my arrow, the blades were shut. My gut response was predictable, I thought it didn’t open. Then I took a deep breath, looked for the dents where the blades hit the ferrule and found the head had worked perfectly. My doe was laying 50 yards away.

 

Q: Do mechanical broadheads really fly better than fixed-blade broadheads?

A: Yes. We have found that at or above 270 feet per second is where larger fixed blade heads can exhibit some wind drift. With precision tuning of the arrow rest and looking closely at the spine of the arrow, large fixed blades like the Thunderhead, can be made to fly extremely well. The faster the arrow goes, the more time you may need to spend on the tuning. Mechanicals almost always fly like field points. There’s very little wind resistance on mechanical heads, so no way to steer the arrow off of target. In 2001 I shot a caribou at 43 yards with a Spitfire with 30 mpg gusty winds and raining. Looking back at the video, you can see the arrow tracking perfectly to the animal and see just a white tuft of hair blow out the back of the animal. It was one of my best kills I’ve ever had, especially in bad conditions.

At high speeds fixed-blade broadheads can drift and plane but with a little bit of tuning, they too can fly like fieldpoints.


Q: Under what circumstances should someone not shoot a mechanical broadhead?

A: 40 foot pounds of kinetic energy would be the minimum I’d recommend when shooting a mechanical head. This would also be the minimum for fixed blades as well. Arrow flight and tuning is even more critical with bows that generate less kinetic energy. With today’s equipment, most hunters are far above this minimum.

 

Q: The hot trend in broadheads right now is massive cutting diameter. What do you think about that? And how does it affect arrow penetration?

A: Yes, cutting diameters on mechanicals are on the way up. With a setup that has 65 to 70 pounds of kinetic energy, the diameter can be increased with no lack of penetration on game animals. Our FOC crossbow head has a three inch cutting diameter. With crossbows generating 100 pounds of energy or more, this is no issue at all. That being said, it’s easy to forget that what was once an average cutting diameter of 1-1/4” a few years ago, some people now consider small. For decades Thunderheads have killed more deer, elk, moose and other big game animals with a cutting diameter of 1-3/16”. Moose and elk hunters have loved the killing power of the 1-1/8” Nitron for years. Blade sharpness, broadhead strength and quality, along with shot placement and arrow flight seem to be much more important than initial cutting diameter. We’ve seen many Spitfire kills where the entrance hole is bigger that the cutting diameter of the head!

Giant cutting diameters are the hot trend, like this Spitfire Maxx.


Q: We all know that the sharpness of the blades on your broadhead is important for a quick kill, better blood trail and short recovery. How can the average bow hunter decide which broadheads have the sharpest blades?

A:Determining broadhead sharpness can be a little tricky sometimes. A lot of people will run their fingers over the blade and if you can feel it catch your skin, they believe it’s sharp. What you’re actually feeling is a roll over burr that some blades produce when being sharpened. Once the burr breaks off, there is a microscopic rounded edge that does not cut cleanly. It’s when you feel nothing at all, then look down and see your blood all over the place, then you truly have a sharp edge. If you don’t want to find out the hard way, slice thru a piece of notebook paper or shave the hair off the back of your hand to be sure. We make sure nothing touches the edge of our blades between when they were manufactured and when you screw them on you arrow to guarantee the sharpest blades possible.

There is no substitute for ultra-sharp blades, the blades on the NAP Hellrazor are just that.


Q: Why should bow hunters replace the blades on their broadheads with new ones from the manufacturer rather than trying to sharpen them on their own?

A: It’s always better to have brand new blades on your heads. Most blades like ours have multiple grind angles that can never truly be resharpened effectively by hand. A solid head like a Hellrazor can be made almost as sharp from the factory by using a high quality flat stone. Patience and skill are needed to get the edge perfect. I cannot overstate the importance of sharp blades for killing game animals as quick as possible. The cost of new, sharp replacement blades may be the difference between finding an animal or not when a marginal hit occurs.

 

Q: Is there any advantage to shooting a 125 grain broadhead rather than a 100 grain broadhead?

A: We’ve found that heavier heads up front do two important things. For one, they just seem to fly better. Moving the front of center balance point forward helps the arrows (or bolt) fly better. Tenpoint Crossbows regularly put brass inserts in their bolts for that very reason. In addition, the penetration power in increased. Studies have been done showing that an arrow of a given weight will out penetrate by just moving the weight forward. I put this to the test last year with a fellow employee at New Archery who has never had a full pass thru. He shoots a lighter weight bow and a short arrow. I constructed some Easton Full Metal Jacket arrows with a 60 grain brass insert. 24-1/2” arrow, 100 grain broadhead for a total weight of 428. Front of center comes in at 15.3 percent. Full pass thru’s are now happening. Don’t worry about any extra drop. Even 25 grains extra up front in stays inside a hunter’s normal grouping pattern inside of 30 yards. Arrow speed loss is negligible and in most cases, the kinetic energy has increased! Whatever grain weight broadhead you choose, make sure your arrow is spined out correctly.

 

Q:The past two years we’ve heard a lot about the NAP Bloodrunner broadhead. Can you tell us why this head has been so popular with bow hunters?

A: Mechanical head sales have soared over the last few years. There are dozens of different designs to choose from. Unfortunately some just don’t perform as well as others under hunting conditions. The Bloodrunner broadhead appeals to hunters who may have tried mechanicals before with bad results or people who would like to try a mechanical, but just seem leery about the whole idea. The Hybrid design of the head is such that in closed position, it has a 1 inch cutting diameter, and by pressing the point back, expands to 1-1/2”. “Even closed, it’s bound to work” is what I hear from potential customers. The fact is there’s no way for it not to open to 1-1/2” cut when passing thru a target. Confidence is key when selecting a broadhead and it’s easy to see how this head performs.

The NAP 2-Blade Bloodrunner offers a huge cutting diameter and a fail-proof expanding design.

 

 

Q: What broadhead will you be shooting this fall?

A: That’s always the toughest question for me to answer because all of the heads we make work so well. A lot of us over here shoot Spitfire’s and Bloodrunner’s. I’ll be shooting the Spitfire Maxx with a 1-3/4” cut. I just need to stay awake in the tree long enough to let one fly…..

The Spitfire Maxx is one of the favorite mechanical broadheads on the market.

NAP Broadheads: Designed to Kill

by Cody Altizer 10. February 2011 03:59
Cody Altizer

  This past weekend I put myself in a painful, near life changing predicament while cleaning my room.  Yes, I know.  Cleaning one’s room sounds far from dangerous or problematic, but I managed to disprove that notion.  However the situation, which I will describe in detail momentarily, did provoke some blog worthy thoughts that I believe could benefit many hunters, and perhaps reduce the risk of you losing a wounded deer this fall.

While I was cleaning out some old desk drawers, I found an old, out-of-date Epipen that caught my eye.  As a seasonal allergy sufferer, I’ve always carried an Epipen in case of allergic reaction, but it 6 years of doing so, I’ve never needed one.  For some reason, however, my curiosity peaked when I found this one and I felt the need to see how it worked.  After unscrewing the cap and giving the device a thorough inspection, I inadvertently applied some pressure to the “wrong end” of the pen and into my thumb pierced a two inch long needle and a 6 year old dose of Epinephrine.  I immediately jumped up, screamed a few explicit words and found that the needle was stuck in my finger.  After a deep breath, I tried to pull it out, because after all, the needle of an Epipen is supposed to automatically retract after injection.  After another deep breath, I tugged a little harder, and even gave the pen a little jerk to free my thumb.  Nothing.  Numbing with pain I went to show my mom who, like all mothers do, screamed with horror and decided that we had to rush to the Emergency Room as quickly as possible.

Now, I’ve had enough broken bones and stitches in my life that I have developed a rather admirable tolerance for pain, if I do say so myself.  My primary concern was to just get the needle out of my thumb as quickly and painlessly as possible, and I figured all would be fine.  I didn’t particularly enjoy looking down at my thumb and having a needle stuck out of it.  However, on the way to the ER my hand and thumb in particular, had turned a sickly pale white.  So I casually and half-jokingly asked my mom, “Are they going to have to cut off my thumb?”  She shook her head no and that thought never crossed my mind again, until aboutan hour later.

My broadhead of choice, the Thunderhead Edge by NAP!

The Emergency Room doctor managed to pull the needle out of my thumb without much problem and I was relieved and ready to go home.  It turns out that the needle went in my thumb, hit the bone and bent to a 90 degree angle, which is why I couldn’t pull it out myself.  But a larger problem ensued.  It turns out Epinephrine is safe to inject anywhere in the body except fingers, toes and the tip of the nose.  Well, last I checked my thumb was a finger.  Epinephrine cuts out the flow of oxygenated blood and prevents healthy circulation, which is why my hand went white almost immediately.  After the doctor told me there was a legitimate chance I could lose my thumb, I realized this was more serious than I thought.  He then reassured me that as long as I got a shot of anecdote within 12 hours, I would be fine, but that too was extremely painful.

The decision was an easy one and as I laid in the Emergency Room bed waiting for the shot, by bowhunter brain kicked into gear.  I began to wonder how a deer must feel when they get shot by an arrow that doesn’t penetrate well requiring them to run through the timber with an arrow stuck in their side.  I can now attest that it must be extremely painful and uncomfortable.  But bad shots happen to everyone, right?  Once the arrow is released there isn’t a whole lot we can do is there?  Yes, of course there is.

Bad shots, just like my accident (although my accident was the result of sheer stupidity and curiosity), do and will happen to every bowhunter at some point in their career.  There are two variables that we can control before the shot.  

 

Is this an ethical shot?  I vote no!  Even though this buck was just 15 yards away when I snapped the photo, he is quartering too much for an ethical shot.

First, it is critical to know the importance of good shot placement.  This means a thorough understanding of a whitetail’s anatomy and thus which shots will result in quick, clean kills.  Broadside or slightly quartering away shots are ideal on whitetails.  They reveal the entire chest cavity which will allow a well-placed arrow to pass through the lungs and/ or heart.  Quartering to shots are ill-advised simply because the window in which an arrow can pierce the vitals is much smaller.  Too often a hunter takes a shot on an animal that is quartering to them too strongly and the arrow hits the shoulder blade, penetration is minimal and the animal is never recovered.  While it may seem like a weak analogy, let’s compare the shot on a whitetail to my thumb injury.  Obviously, the needle wasn’t well placed.  Epipens are actually to be injected in the thigh, where the Epinephrine is safe to do its job and where pain will be the least.  An Epipen injection in the thigh is synonymous with a double lung or heart shot deer.   A broadhead that passes through a whitetail’s lungs almost always results in the animal expiring in less than 15-20 seconds and the animal is almost always recovered.  An Epipen injection in the thumb is synonymous to shooting a whitetail in the paunch, brisket or shoulder blade.  Penetration will be minimal and the animal is likely to suffer a painful death, or never be recovered by the hunter.

The second variable we can control is what broadhead we shoot and how sharp they are.  A strong, sharp broadhead that cuts through the air like a dart increases shooting confidence and also results in bigger blood trails and thus quicker recoveries.   I started using New Archery Products (NAP) broadheads during the 2010 season and they really opened my eyes to what a quality broadhead is capable of.  I harvested two whitetails this past season with the Thunderhead Edge, a hard hitting broadhead with serrated blades for maximum sharpness and devastation to blood vessels and arteries.  Both shots were pass throughs and the deer expired in less than 10 seconds in both instances.  I also filmed Todd Graf harvesting an adult doe with the Spitfire Maxx, an expandable broadhead that buried itself nearly 6 inches in the ground after the shot.  In mid-October I filmed Jeremy Enders’ harvest a doe with the NAP Nitron that quickly passed through his first ever whitetail and buried itself 6 inches in the ground.  That doe made it less than 40 yards before tipping over.  Finally, I didn’t film Justin Zarr’s Halloween morning buck, but accompanied him on the massive blood trail his Nitron tipped arrow left that lead to an easy recovery.

 

While this yearling buck was certainly no shooter at the time, he did present an opportunity for a perfect quartering away shot.  By aiming at the opposite side front leg, an arrow would easily pass through both lungs and result in a quick recovery,

Granted the above examples were the result of well-placed shots, the damage done by NAP broadheads was undeniable.  Unlike cheap, dull poorly made broadheads, NAP broadheads strike quickly and cleanly and blast through hide, flesh and bone.  The needle of the Epipen that nearly cost me my thumb was not the most durable made product.  Then again, it’s not designed to tear through flesh and bone, but I think a parallel can be drawn here.  When you shoot a whitetail, do you want your broadhead to bend, brake or deflect when striking bone or rib cage, or do you want it to blast through like an NAP broadhead?  Like the decision to keep or lose a thumb, I think the answer is an easy one.

 

NAP 2 Blade BloodRunner Review: Real World Results

by Scott Abbott 14. January 2011 06:53
Scott Abbott

October 30th, 2010 found me set up in a shag bark hickory tree over looking a promising bedding area. It didn't take long for the magic of a first time stand sit to kickoff as the deer materialized in and out of the thicket I was setup in.  After numerous exciting encounters throughout that late afternoon with deer, the buck that I was there for prowled onto the scene to push around the few younger bucks that were in and out of my area the last couple hours. 

As fate would have it, there he stood at 7 yards slightly quartering away.  With my stands platform 18 feet up I slid my bow between the tree and I, then drew my bow nocked with a GoldTip Velocity Pro arrow shaft tipped with a NAP 2 Blade Bloodrunner broadhead.  The shot felt perfect, right up the back of the leg center punching the chest cavity height wise. 

The big ole' bodied buck didn't even run at the shot. He jumped sideways over a small creek runoff from a swamp, took a few steps and stood there for a few seconds. He then staggered off and disappeared on the other side of a rise into the tangle of brush and greenbriar I was setup within.

As perfect as the shot felt and looked from the entrance hole I recognized immediately that I hit the offside shoulder and did not achieve a pass through.  I knew the huge cut of the Bloodrunner coupled with my entrance point that it would be a short tracking job, and I was right.  He didn't cover 40-50 yards, he was just on the other side of the rise that he disappeared behind after the shot.

Although I cannot say that my arrow survived the shot unscathed, the Bloodrunner surely did.  It received superficial blade damage from the sudden stop of the impact with the offside shoulder.  No bent or broken blades to speak of, just some small nicks on the razor edge of the broadhead.  That is saying a lot for a mechanical style head to take an impact like that and still be standing afterward.

I must say that I am very happy with the performance of these broadheads and will for sure carry them in my quiver again this coming autumn.

Here is a photo of the broadhead, you can see the minuscule damage I spoke of on the left hand side blade.

You can purchase the NAP Bloodrunner here at bowhunting.com by following this link.

The NAP Nitron | Little Broadhead, Big Results

by Justin Zarr 29. November 2010 15:00
Justin Zarr

As I move into my 30's and close in on my 2nd decade of chasing whitetails with a bow I can't help but notice the vast amount of trends that we see in the archery and hunting industries.  Every year there's a barage of great new innovations that are sure to make us more effective bowhunters.  However the more I hunt the more I find myself relying on the tried and true products and technologies that have two distinct qualities; durability and dependability.

One segment of bowhunting that has seen remarkable advancements in technologies over the years is broadheads.  In today's marketplace they come in all shapes, sizes and colors.  Each one taughting it's ability to blast through  hide, bust through bone and create holes roughly the size of a small planet.  With a seemingly endless supply of celebrity endorsements, TV commercials and print ads you'd think some of these heads would darn near jump out of your quiver and kill your quarry all by themselves!

The Nitron from New Archery Products is a broadhead that many bowhunters may not be familiar with.  There's no fancy ad campaigns pushing it, no TV celebrities with their smiling face on the package, and no lame catch-phrases being coined in it's honor.  This is a product that has silently snuck under the radar despite it's impeccable qualites that make it, in my opinion, one of the finest broadheads ever produced.

Made from 100% stainless steel from the tip to the ferrule to the blades the Nitron is both durable as well as dependable.  I have personally shot this head through the shoulder of several whitetails with devastating results.  Complete penetration through the entire animal and a broadhead that looked virtually brand new when I picked it up afterwards.

Like all NAP broadheads the Nitron features surgical steel Diamize blades which makes them the sharpest in the industry.  The Diamize process is exclusive to all NAP broadheads which is part of their recipe for success.  When it comes to putting down animals in a hurry, having sharp blades is a must.  The sharper the blades the better the penetration and better blood trails since the coagulants in the animals's blood cannot adhere to the slick edges left by sharp blades.  Sharper blades mean quicker kills - period.

Possibly the finest feature of this broadhead is it's accuracy.  I've shot my fair share of broadheads before, both fixed blade and mechanicals, and have yet to find one as accurate as the Nitron.  This "mini" broadhead, with it's 1 1/16" cutting diameter flies like a dart.  While the current trend may be "massive wound channels" and holes big enough to stick your fist in, I'll take a well placed arrow that's going to deliver both entrance and exit holes any day.  Throwing an axe through an animal sounds great, but doesn't mean much if you don't hit where you need to.

While many bowhunters shy away from the Nitron's small size, I assure you this only works to your advantage.  The small profile of this broadhead not only reduces drag and wind planing to make it more accurate, it also reduces friction as it passes through the animal which increases penetration.  Just two weeks ago I took down a 200 plus pound whitetail with this broadhead which you will see on this week's episode of Bowhunt or Die!  From the time my arrow struck the buck it took a mere 13 seconds for the animal to expire.  Proving yet again that there simply is no substitute for accuracy, durabilty and sharpness.  Don't let the size fool you, this broadhead is a stone cold killer.

Since 2006 I've been fortunate enough to harvest 14 whitetails and 1 antelope with the NAP Nitron.  Every shot has produced both entry and exit wounds. Nearly half of those animals have fallen within sight of my stand and those that didn't generally made it just out of sight before expiring.  I have replaced the blades and shot multiple animals with the same head without a problem.  Dependable, durable, and accurate - that's the Nitron.  For my money, it doesn't get much better than this.

If you're in the market for a new broadhead I encourge you to try out the Nitron.  You may just be surprised that such a small head can deliver such big results.  You can purchase them right here in the Bowhunting.com store.  Click here for the 100 grain Nitron and click here for the 125 grain Nitron.  Don't let the "crossbow" title confuse you, a broadhead is a broadhead no matter what arrow you screw it on the end of.

ATA Show Day 1 Impressions

by Justin Zarr 8. January 2009 15:30
Justin Zarr

The first day of the 2009 ATA show once again brought a lot of anticipation to see what new products would be hitting the market for this year.  The entire Bowhunting.com staff is here in attendance, checking in on the latest gear and bringing you the most up to date info on what's happening in the archery world.

One of the first products that caught my eye is the Universal Bow Rope Holder from Pine Ridge Archery.  As simple as this product is, I personally think it's a great it.  Basically, the holder screws onto your treestand, either a lock-on or a climber, and includes a hoist rope that can be used to pull up your bow, pack, or other gear you may have in th field with you.  As someone who hangs and hunts from quite a few treestands during the season I think this is a great product.  I fully intend on putting one of these on every stand I have, just to make sure I always have a bow rope handy when I need one.  There's nothing worse, or more unsafe, than trying to climb up into your stand with your bow in your hand.

The new Fusion vane from Norway Industries also caught my eye today.  One of the hottest new products of this year's show, this vane features a stiff, durable material in a shield cut vane for optimal broadhead flight, fused with a softer, more pliable base for better adhesion to your shafts and more flexibility in case your fletchings do contact anything on the way towards your target.  I picked up a sample of these vanes and plan on fletching up a few arrows next week in preparation for our indoor shooting leagues which start soon.

I forgot to snap photos at the Duravanes booth, but did find this video on YouTube the other day.  It gives a pretty good explanation of what these vanes are all about. 

 

Another cool product Todd and I saw was the Timber Tread.  Essentially, this rugged step slips over and attaches to your screw-in treestep to offer a larger and more stable platform when climbing and/or decending your tree.  This step accessory helps grip your boot sole more securely and prevent slipping in wet or cold weather.  The Timber Tread is 3.5 inches wide and 4.5 inches long and works great for both lock-on type stands as well as tree saddles.

New for 2009, Lone Wolf now offers a wider version of their popular Sit & Climb stand, which is 3 inches wider than the standard version.  This larger version is more accomodating for larger hunters, or for those cold weather hunts when you've got a few extra inches of clothing on.

New Archery Products released several new broadheads this year, one of which is the Bloodrunner.  This rearward-opening expandable broadhead features a 1" cutting diameter when in flight, and opens to a full 1.5" cutting diameter on impact without losing any kinetic energy or penetrating power.  This looks like a super durable head that can withstand just about anything, and will penetrate extremely well.  I'm personally looking forward to testing them out soon!

Muddy Outdoors has released a new set of climbing sticks that feature a buckle-less fastening system that is completely silent both in transport and when attaching to your tree.  Simply slide the climbing-grade rope into the cam locks, pull it tight, and tie it off and you're up your tree in seconds.  These new climbing sticks also feature dual steps that work in tandem to support your weight while climbing, and offer a greater range of flexibility when climbing those crooked trees, or ones with a lot of limbs.  The new climbing sticks also pack down tightly and attach to the Muddy Outdoors treestands for lightweight, easy transportation.

New from Scent Blocker for this year is the Bone Collector line of apparel and boots.  Based around the new TV show of the same name staring noted personality Michael Waddel, the Freak Nasty Jacket features both activated carbon and S3 technology to eliminate and prevent odors, along with a neat silent wrist fastening system for securing the cuffs.  Thank you for not using velcro!!!  The jacket also has 6 roomy front pockets, 2 rear pockets, and accepts a fleece zip-in vest for colder days.  This is a great looking jacket that I'm eager to test out come next fall.

 

To wrap up Day 1, the Huntmore 360* stool is finally ready for production and will be available in stores shortly.  This compact stool weighs a mere 9 pounds, folds down quickly and quietly and stores in the included bag, and is perfect for ground blind hunting.  The feet have been enlarged for this year to make it more stable even on wet ground, and the patented cast aluminum hub system makes this stool extremely strong and deadly quiet.  When it comes to hunting out of a ground blind, or from the ground in general, there is no better stool than the Huntmore 360.  As soon as they're available to the public, you can bet I'll have one!

I'll make sure to update the site tomorrow night with more products and I learn about them, so check back tomorrow night!  

NAP Releases New Broadheads - Braxe, BloodRunner, and Spitfire Maxx

by Bowhunting.com Staff 18. November 2008 02:18
Bowhunting.com Staff

New Archery Products, the leader in archery accesory innovation for more than 20 years, has released details on three new broadheads for 2009.

The BloodRunner is an rearward-opening expandable broadhead that delivers a 1 1/2 inch cutting diameter on impact for massive bloodtrails and quick recoveries.  The BloodRunner has a 1" cutting diameter when closed for field point accuracy.  0.036" thick blades provide extreme sharpness and dependability.  The BloodRunner will be sold in packs of 3 and available in 100 grains.

 

One word describes the new Braxe broadhead - Extreme!  The Braxe is the ultimate in strength and performance featuring three double-edge razor-sharp offest blades and a bone-crushing Trivex point.  The combination of the offset blades with the double cutting edges is called "core drilling" technology and delivers a massive wound channel that won't close and prevent a good blood trail.  This means not only better penetration but larger blood trails and shorter recoveries.

The Spitfire Maxx is a larger version of the legendary Spitfire broadhead with an increased 1 3/4" cutting diameter.  Field point accuracy, cut-on-contact tip, offset blades, and no o-rings are the trademark features that serious bowhunters have come to rely on from the Spitfire series of broadheads for over a decade.

   

 

All three new broadheads from NAP will be available for purchase right here on Bowhunting.com in January 2009.  Check back often for additional product updates and availability from your #1 source for archery and bowhunting gear - Bowhunting.com!

Categories: Current News



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