Bowhunting.com Submit your photo

Bowhunting Wisconsin Whitetails and Wyoming Elk

by Todd Graf 14. September 2011 14:32
Todd Graf

‘Tis the season, folks!  As I write this blog, I am washing my clothes, fine tuning my Mathews Monster, cleaning out my truck and doing anything bowhunting related to pass the time before the Wisconsin archery opener this Saturday!  Ah, bow season is finally here!  After a terribly long offseason, I can’t wait to get up a tree Saturday morning and enjoy the beautiful scenery that Central Wisconsin has to offer.

After a slow start to the offseason with my Camtrakkers, I was finally able to get some Wisconsin shooter bucks showing up on my cameras, just in time for the season!   Honestly, while getting pictures of big bucks on trail camera during the summer is fun, it does little to help me kill them come fall, because I know their patterns will change drastically.  However, knowing where mature bucks are spending their time on my property during late August and early September can really help me get a bead on those bucks heading into the hunting season.  

I am hoping that any of these nice Wisconsin whitetails will make the mistake of walking under my stand this fall!

With the bucks seemingly coming out of the wood works in the last couple weeks, I have decided to try and implement a new strategy this fall to better my chances of harvesting a mature buck: hunting out of a ground blind.  I recently set out a hay bale blind that will enable me to hunt (successfully, hopefully) off the ground this fall.  This is a new tactic for me and one I am excited about trying.  Normally, my hunting strategy consists of me hunting out of a Lone Wolf Hang-On and set of sticks and staying mobile to keep the deer from patterning me.  In fact, my 2010 Illinois buck was a result of moving my set to get closer to the action.  However, sometimes there simply isn’t a tree suitable for a treestand of any sort where the deer are congregating, and hunting out of a ground blind is the next best option.  One thing is for sure, I can’t wait to get up close and personal with the deer this fall!

Hopefully this hay bale blind will allow me to get up closer and personal with some monster bucks this season.  

It’s hard to believe, but in just a couple of days, I will be up a tree hunting whitetails.  Even harder to believe is that following my first couple hunts in Wisconsin, I will be making a trip out to Table Mountain Outfitters in Wyoming to hunt with longtime friends Scott and Angie Denny.  I am particularly excited for this trip, and am hoping to duplicate the success I had last year antelope hunting.  If you remember, Justin Zarr and I both shot good antelope bucks hunting with Scott and Angie.  I am hoping that Table Mountain Outfitters can turn into my little Western honey hole!  

My little man, Craig, standing next to some native grasses.  If I were a deer, I would definitely want to hide in there, then come out for an afternoon snack on some clover, wouldn't you?

Craig and his friend, Sammy, are looking forward to hunting together out of this comfortable condo.  In fact, when those brutally cold Midwest temperatures arrive late season, I may even sneak up there for a hunt or two.  

I genuinely wish each and every one of you the best of luck this fall, but more importantly, wish you safe travels and time afield.  I’ll be spending a lot of time in the woods between Illinois and Wisconsin, so if you see me out there keeping the roads hot, stop by and say hello!  I always have a little free time to talk hunting!  If you guys are hunting out of a tree, please be sure to wear your safety harness, and remember you have a family waiting for you at home.   No buck, regardless how big, is worth risking your life over!  Also, if you are fortunate enough to enjoy some success, we here at bowhunting.com want to share in your success!  Please send us your trophy photos to this link here!  Good luck this fall everyone, stay safe and happy hunting!

Preseason Bowhunting Preparations

by Neal McCullough 31. July 2011 15:07
Neal McCullough

Tomorrow is August 1st and as the summer finally winds down this month, I’ll be ramping up my preparations for the impending hunting season.  If you’re a hunter like me, the anticipation—and the accompanying scheduling, strategizing and planning—is almost as exciting as the season itself. 

Of course, preparation for the upcoming season starts way before August.  I spent some time this June and July creating Monster Raxx mineral sites—in my hunting spots in Minnesota and Wisconsin—and strategically placing trail cameras around these sites.  Recently, I’ve had time to check my various trail camera locations and have been pleased to see that some of the bucks I was chasing last year, along with some new ones, that are showing up on my cameras. 

 
This "High-Brow" buck showed up on my CamTrakker on July 17, 2011

These next few weeks leading up to opening day will definitely give me an idea of what big deer I’ll have a chance at this season as I continue to check my trail cameras in different locations.


Monster Raxx mineral sites have been extremely effective for me this year.

Apart from all the time I spent collecting vital information on the deer in my properties, I’ve also spent time working on fine-tuning my new Matthews Z7 Extreme to tightening my shot groups at 20, 30, 40 and even 50 yards.  I have always liked the advice to "practice at 50 yards so 25 yards feels like a chip shot" when getting my bow ready for the season. I have spent a few afternoons doing this very thing at a local target range near my house. With my sight pins adjusted and I am very close to being “dialed-in” for the 2011 season (most years my goal is to be ready August 1 - this year is no exception). 

 


Real Avid's "Toolio" makes bow tuning fast and easy; here I am adjusting my site pins while target shooting. 

As if the anticipation of whitetail opener wasn’t enough to fill up my August, on the 15th of this month, we’ll be heading to Wyoming to hunt Pronghorn Antelope.  This will definitely be a new experience for me; I’m excited for the new challenges that this hunt will bring—from the open terrain to hunting a new quarry—it should be a great adventure.  We’ll be capturing the hunt on film, so for those of you who follow the Bowhunt or Die webisodes, check back at the end of August to see how our inaugural antelope hunt turned out.  


I may not have any trail cameras on Wyoming Antelope; but this southeastern MN buck has my attention.

Good luck with your preseason scouting and hopefully your seasons are successful.

See you in the woods,
Neal McCullough

CamTrakker MK-10 Trail Camera Review

by Josh Fletcher 2. June 2011 11:40
Josh Fletcher
Do you want a game camera that has a no glow IR flash, or do you want high quality color night time photos? Are you a person who may want both depending on the situation or time of the year? The camera that you may want to take a more in depth look at is the CamTrakker MK-10. CamTrakker is a name that all hunters have herd of and has been around for years, so I was excited to test out the new MK-10 by CamTrakker.
The new MK-10 by CamTrakker
As soon as I received the MK-10 in the mail I knew right away that this camera is a quality product that is made in the USA. My initial impression of the craftsmanship and durability of the camera was phenomenal. It is a very sturdy and heavy duty camera sealed in a high quality and durable housing. I would not recommend it but I seriously would not be afraid to drop this camera because of its durability. The MK-10 is camouflaged in Natural Gear, giving it a natural look while attached to a tree to keep it hidden from both animals and thieves. Since we are on the topic of thieves, the MK-10 comes equipped with an all metal locking flange that can be locked securely to a tree.
The MK-10 attaches to the tree using a rope ratchet strap
A further look into the heart of the MK-10, reveals the secret of flash selection. The camera comes with a smoke colored lens that attaches to the flash, by switching the setting in the set up menu of the camera you can either use the high powered flash for colored photos at night, or if you are afraid that the flash spooks deer, then place on the smoke lens over the flash and switch the mode to IR in the camera settings and you now have a camera that produces a “no glow IR flash”. There are no LED lights that light up in this mode for potential thieves to spot at night, this is especially important if you are using the MK-10 for security on your toys or residence.
For a "No Glow IR Flash" just put attatch the smoke lens to the flash
The MK-10 stores your images to a standard SD card. The digital camera takes high quality 5.0 megapixel photos. The trigger speed is lightning fast with a night time speed of 0.186 seconds and a day time trigger speed of 0.388 seconds. The MK-10 is powered by a rechargeable lead-acid battery, and when I tested the MK-10, was in the dead of Wisconsin winter and I got a little over two months of battery life in very cold temperatures. A feature that I have never seen on a game camera before is the on/off switch is located on the outside of the camera, making it very simple to turn the camera on or off without having to unlock and open up the camera to turn the camera off.
Here is one of many photos from the field test of the MK-10
This camera is equipped with a 1.2” color LCD monitor. I didn’t realize how much I would love this feature until I tested the MK-10. The LCD monitor allows you to review your photos while in the field without having to remover SD card. The best part of having the LCD monitor is that in the menu settings you can activate the monitor to give you a “live” view of what the camera sees. Basically you can set up the camera at the perfect height and angle by looking at the monitor.
The MK-10 comes with a LCD screen for reviewing pictures in the field
I will admit that because of all the features that the MK-10 offers, this is a camera that would be difficult to take right out of the box and use it without first learning about the camera. This may turn some hunters off from using the MK-10, however the camera comes with an in depth CD –rom that not only shows you how to set the MK-10 to the features you want, but also explains them in depth. After reading and reviewing the operator’s manual, my camera was ready for the field test. It attaches to the tree using a supplied rope ratchet strap. I set the flash to approximate distance to the deer trail that I placed it on to prevent both an over powering flash that would wash out the picture or an under powered flash that wouldn’t light up the deer good enough for detail. After several weeks in the field, I took a look at the picture quality and what the MK-10 captured. I was very impressed with the quality of the photos. The MK-10 took high quality photos that worked great for my new screen saver and the trigger speed was excellent. The important thing to keep in mind is that there is a lot of settings and features, the key is learning these settings. With a little practice you can open the light setting to take brighter photos for when your camera is placed in a darker environment such as a thick cedar swamp, or you can darken your photos for a brighter environment such as a snow covered field. The flash is also adjustable and very powerful. This is a strong feature if you are placing your camera on a field edge or a food plot where the deer may be out of the range of the flash on most other cameras, and if you are setting the camera up on a trail you can turn down the flash so that it doesn’t wash out the picture. With these different settings you can obtain the best quality picture to be taken by a game camera.
Fast trigger speed means more centered photos
I broke down the pros and cons of the MK-10 to better help you decide if this is the camera for you.
Pros
· Super-fast trigger speed
· The option of both regular flash or No Glow IR flash
· High quality solid construction locking flange to secure the camera from thieves
· 1.2” LCD monitor for aiming the camera and in the field review of pictures
· An exterior on/off switch
· Adjustable high powered flash
· Adjustable light settings to adjust the picture lighting to the given environment
· Natural Gear camouflage housing to blend the camera to the surroundings
· Very well built and durable housing to protect the camera
· Easy to attach the camera to the tree with the rope ratchet strap
· High quality photos, great for reviewing points on your next trophy or screen saver
· Long battery life in cold temperatures
· Made in Watkinsville Georgia, American made
Cons
· You have to learn the camera, a lot of features that you would be missing out on if you didn’t take the time to learn the operation of the MK-10
· Because of the Lead-Acid battery it makes the MK-10 heavier than most game cameras
· You have to either carry out the battery to take it home to charge it or carry in another battery to replace the dead battery, versus just carrying in several D or AA batteries
· The MK-10 is a larger camera than some of the compact models available
This picture is a great example of a fast trigger speed
These are the pros and cons to the MK-10 by CamTrakker, however the pros to this camera for me out weigh the cons. I am very impressed with the MK-10, it is a durable high quality game camera that is proudly made in the USA, a superfast trigger speed, and the options of either a standard flash or a no glow IR flash with just a simple setting adjustment and the placement of a lens. The MK-10 is a camera that you will definitely want to check out for this fall.

Food Plot Strategies and Food Plot Maintenance

by Cody Altizer 29. May 2011 10:31
Cody Altizer

In Episode 4 of Bowhunt or Die last fall, Justin Zarr made a bold prediction concerning the success of the remainder of his hunting season.  He said, with confidence and certainty, that he was going to kill a mature buck off his hunting property in Lake County, Illinois.  His trust in his skills and strategy was admirable and I immediately knew that he was going to put his tag on a mature buck.

With summer just weeks away, and my mind slowly, but comfortingly, thinking of cool fall days spent in the tree stand, I am going to make a fearless forecast myself.  I WILL shoot a mature whitetail on October 1st, the opening day of the Virginia archery season.  I haven’t felt this confident in an opening day set up ever, and I am sure I can put the pieces together this offseason to accomplish my goal.  Here’s how.

My Imperial Whitetail Clover food plot measure 17 inches before I cut it with the bush hog.  It was a beautiful sight and I felt good knowing that I had supplied a constant, nutritious food source for the deer. 

This quest for an opening day whitetail actually began last August, when I planted a clover and oat food plot.  The oats were planted for fall attraction, and they performed extremely well last hunting season.  However, I was more excited about how the clover would take off this spring and it did not disappoint.  A little spot seeding in late March proved to be beneficial because by mid-May, my food plot had turned into a lush green carpet of delicious, nutritious deer food.  Couple that with the steady rainfall we have been receiving in Virginia and the clover had grown to be 17 inches tall!  This was turning out to be the most successful food plot I had ever planted.

It was bittersweet mowing my clover food plot, but it had to be done.  This simple step will ensure the health and attractiveness of this food plot throughout the summer and into fall.

In order to ensure that deer continue feeding in my food plot throughout the summer months and into the hunting season, an important task must be completed regularly, mowing.  Mowing a food plot is a step that can drastically increase the overall health of the food plot while making it more attractive to deer at the same time.  As a food plot matures and continues to grow, it will actually lose its nutritional value and attractiveness when it gets to a certain age, or more appropriately, length.  I must admit, it was a bittersweet experience mowing my food plot.  The white blooms were so prevalent that it looked as if a mid-May snowfall had blanketed the food plot and walking in clover 17 inches tall made me feel like I was doing something right.   Nevertheless, the mowing had to be done.  

This shot illustrates just how well the clover was doing.  I used the lens hood off my 24-105mm Wide Angle lens for a size reference.  

This cutting will likely be the first of 4-5 cuttings I will make this summer, depending on rainfall.  Mowing the clover will help make sure the protein level remains, not peaks, at 20-25% throughout the summer, which is needed for the antler growing bucks, lactating does and young fawns on my property.  Keeping the clover young and tender not only keeps it at its most nutritional and digestible state, but also helps with weed control as well.  Cutting back the weeds will allow the quickly regenerating clover to choke out the weeds and unwanted grasses that do their best to take over my food plot.  I do not substitute mowing for regular spraying, however.  

After I finished mowing the clover, I took a quick minute to hang my CamTrakker so I could monitor what deer are utilizing my food plot right now.  I honestly do not expect a whole of activity right away.  Spring green up is in full swing in Virginia so there is plenty of tender, nutritious natural browse available for the deer in the woods.  In fact, I will actually be thrilled if the deer aren’t feeding heavily on the clover right now, because that tells me that I’ve done a good job in recent years controlling the doe population and supplementing natural browse.   

A strategically placed CamTrakker will let me know what caliber deer are feeding in my food plot and when.  

So there you have it, a hunting prediction made in late May.  You’re probably thinking, “He must be crazy, he can’t honestly believe he can make a guarantee that leaves so much to chance like hunting does!”  Well you’re right; I am crazy, but also confident.   If the conditions are right in Virginia on October 1st, then I should harvest a whitetail in the morning on its way to bed after feeding in the clover, or on its way for dinner in the afternoon.  A crazy prediction it is, but I bet you’ll be checking back in October to see if I was right.  

Warm Temperatures in the Midwest; Great News For Hunting Food Plots!

by Todd Graf 20. April 2010 15:02
Todd Graf

These recent warm temperatures and relatively dry weather has been great for those of us who want to get any early start on our food plots.  Unlike last year I am already ahead of schedule by two weeks which is always a good thing!

My fertilzer tests were done early, the results are back already and fertilzer has been spread.  Additionally the majority of my fields have been burned off or mowed off, my clover has been planted and I just had a large group of seedling trees planted as well. I have to admit I am feeling ahead of the game.  I decided not to chase any turkeys this spring, but instead to focus on making adjustments so I can hopefully put myself in a position to havest a nice buck this fall.  So far things have been going very well and I'm really pleased with the progress I've made.


This spring I am going to test forage beans and a sorghum plot to see what kind of wildlife I can attract, and how well those plots hold up.

As you may have seen in some of my earlier Blogs and video posts, shed antler hunting was a sucess this year as I did find a few more then usual.  Myself and a couple good friends of mine picked up quite a few antlers in and around my winter food plots, including the matched set to a buck I call "Flyer".  He is #1 on my hit list for this fall.

With the bowhunting season less than 5 months away now (in Wisconsin anyways) I'm starting to think about some new gear and getting everything tuned up this summer.  After my trips to the ATA Show and both the Iowa and Wisconsin Deer & Turkey Expos I've put together a short list of some new products that you should be keeping an eye on for this fall.  If you're in the market for some new gear you may want to check these out.

Mathews Z7 compound bow - I shot this bow at the Wisconsin show and man is it smooth and fast.  Mathews has always been regarded as one of, if not the best, bow manufacturer out there and it's not hard to see why with bows like the Z7. Also, if you haven't read the full blown compound bow report that we put together on of all the new bows for this year, check it out

Camtrakker MK10 Scouting Camera - everyone knows I'm a trail camera junkie and having tested the new MK10 recently I think there may be a few more of these in my scouting arsenal come summertime.  This new camera takes 5 MP photos both by day and night, and has the option of either a standard strobe flash or infrared flash, which is a very unique and awesome feature.  You can purchase the MK10 right here on Bowhunting.com by clicking this link.

New Archery Products 2 Blade BloodRunner - I shot the 3 blade version of this broadhead last year and was super impressed with it's performance.  Now that the 2 blade version is out with it's enormous 2 1/16" cutting diameter I'm looking forward to heading into the field with these on the end of my arrow this fall. 

Reconyx new Hyperfire Series Trail Camera - although I haven't had a chance to use one in the field yet, if these new cameras perform anythng like my RC55's and RC60's do I think they will be a super hot ticket for bowhunters this fall. 

Pine Ridge Archery Ground Blind Camera Mount - last year I purchased a new ground blind to hunt from with my son, and we had a blast together.  The trouble was, with two of us in the blind it got really cramped with my big video tripod.  This new camera mount from the guys at Pine Ridge Archery takes up barely any room and it works for both filming your own hunts as well as filming with another person.  Great tool!

Havalon Piranta Knives - in case you missed our video review of this product earlier this year, you have to check these things out.  They feature a replaceable razor blade which means you get the sharpest blade possible every time.  No more messing with sharpeners or trying to use a dull knife when field dressing or caping out your next trophy.

Knight & Hale Ultimate Fighting Purr Call - even though I may not be chasing turkeys this spring, I know a lot of you are!  This new call from Knight & Hale is an entire fighting purr system in one compact unit that can be used with just one hand.  Click here to purchase in the Bowhunting.com store. 

Knight & Hale Pack Rack - Another great compact calling option from Knight & Hale is the Pack Rack and new Pack Rack Magnum.  This compact call simulates the sound of two bucks fighting and is contained in one compact package that provides ease of mobility and use.  Great for bowhunters who want to pack light and not lug around a full set of rattling antlers.  Click here to purchase.

Summit Treestands Switchblade - Summit has long been known for the comfort of their treestands and the Switchblade is no exception.  The Switchblade is basically the same as the popular Viper in a new collapsible version for easier transport in and out of your hunting area. Look for these in the Bowhunting.com shopping cart later this year.

Code Blue Grave Digger lures - available in Whitetail Doe Estrous and Whitetail Buck Urine, these lures stay strong regardless of weather conditions.  This means you won't have to refresh your mock scrapes and scent stations as frequently even after it rains.  Be on the lookout for these products in the Bowhunting.com cart later this summer when they become available.

Another thing I want to mention are a few of the new websites that have recently been designed and built by us here at the Rhino Group.  For those of you that don't know, we develop custom websites for many businesses in the hunting industry.  Below are a few of the more recent websites we built that you may want to check out.

thelegendsofthefall.com - The Legends of the Fall is a brand new TV show airing this summer on the Outdoor Channel featuring a few notable faces that you may have seen over the years on Drury Outdoors videos and TV shows.  Mike & Bonnie McFerrin, Eric Hale, Chris Ward, Mark Luster, and Dave Bogart have teamed up to create this new show that is packed full of both monster bucks and good laughs. 

 

 

 

robinsonoutdoors.com - This new website for Robinson Outdoor Products (Scent Blocker & Scent Shield) features a complete upgrade of their existing shopping cart along with a ton of great interactive features like a trophy gallery, video clips from popular TV shows like Michael Waddell's Bone Collector, Tech Tips, and much more. 

 

 

 

 

legacyquestoutdoors.com - also known as the Mossy Oak Rustiks brand, Legacy Quest Outdoors offers a variety of products made from rustick and antique woods that have been collected from a variety of sources including old barns, railroads, bridge trussels, and other unique places.  If you're looking for a great way to bring the rustic feeling of the outdoors into your home or cabin you won't want to miss this!  A full online catalog and shopping cart lets you browse their selection of products from the comfort of your own home and order most of them online.

 

If you have a business in need of website development, whether you are in the hunting industry or not, give us a call at 847-515-8000 and find out what the Rhino Group can do for you.  Or check out our online portfolio at www.rhinogroup.com

All in all I am looking forward to a great year and I want to take a few moments to mention a new friend of mine and more importantly the doctor that has saved my son's life. My son Craig, age 5 at the time, was diagnosed with an extremely rare health issue - increased intracranial venous pressure over a year ago.  This high pressure in his brain caused him to lose vision in his left eye and also caused a subdural hematoma (blood inside his head). Dr. Ali Shaibani was able to figure out Craig’s problems had recognized that Craig was missing his left sigmoid transverse sinus and had a large occlusion in right one. This was causing backpressure in Craig’s head and if untreated would have lead our little man to even worse places. Dr. Shaibani was able to successfully place a stent in Craig’s brain to decrease the pressure. This is a very rare case and Craig is on the recovery track. The cool part is I have been able to get to know Dr. Shaibani more closely and wouldn't you know it - he wants to start bowhunting! I am very glad that I've been able to kick start his hunting opportunities and I look forward to helping him harvest his first deer this fall.

 
Dr. Shaibani with his new Diamand Stud bow setup, purchased right here at Bowhunting.com.  Thanks for being so good at what you do!


My little man starting his way to a healthy recovery.

Todd Graf - Strength & Honor!

All New Trail Cameras for 2009 - Announced at the bowhunting ATA Show.

by Todd Graf 10. January 2009 13:09
Todd Graf

Here is the run down for all the new trail cameras for 2009.

CamTrakker - Unit MK-8

After talking with Dan Stoneburner, the owner of CamTrakker, I found that his focus will remain the same as he continues to improve on the CamTrakker MK-8. Although this unit was released in 2008, changes have been made to the unit's firmware upgrades. The MK-8's most recent update has really made the unit very stable and is working great. If you have already purchased a Camtrakker MK-8 you should contact CamTrakker to make sure your unit is upgraded to the newest version.

Here are some of the highlighted features of the CamTrakker MK-8:

  1. Adjustable flash ranges for both IR operation and Strobe flash operation.
  2. Long lasting lead-acid battery life, included with purchase.
  3. Easy to use & set-up
  4. Ability to view photos in the field.
  5. Easy access to both battery and SD Card
  6. High quality images
  7. Burst mode for daytime images

Recon Outdoors - Viper

The Viper is one of the latest additions to the Recon Outdoors line of Infrared digital scouting and security cameras.  We will be adding Recon trail cameras to our site this year and we look forward to testing these units.

Here are some of the highlighted features:

  1. New shape and superior functionality - this unit is extremely small
  2. 2.1 MP infrared images
  3. You no longer have to open the unit to check cameras status
  4. One keypad on the front of the unit allows you to view everything including picture count, battery voltage, available memory space all at a glance of any eye.
  5. Available in no camo and Mossy Oak Tree Stand.

Bushnell - All New - Trophy Cam Model (119415) includes built in LCD color viewer & 119405 (B & W Text LCD)

You will not believe the size of this unit. It is small enough to fit in the palm of your hand and is packed with some incredible features. This unit is so small you could fit them right into your pants pockets.

  1. 3 / 5 Mp high quality full color
  2. Day / Night Auto sensor
  3. Adjustable PIR (low/medium/High)
  4. Trigger speed less than 1 second
  5. Multi image mode - 1 - 3 images per trigger
  6. Temperature ranges / -5 - 140 degrees
  7. 24 infrared night vision LED's - 45 feet range
  8. Runs off of 8 AA batteries for up to 6 months.
  9. Video length up to 60 seconds.
  10. Requires the purchase of a SD Card.
  11. Model 119415 comes with color built-in LCD color viewfinder

 
In the photo above you can see how small the new Bushnell Trophy Cam is comed to the older units.

Reconyx - MC65 Solocam IR - All New for 2009

Reconyx introduced the next generation in digtail scouting with the Mathews edition Solocam camera.

  1. 1/5 Second Trigger speed
  2. 1 Photo per second
  3. Lo-Glow IR - Semi-Convert
  4. IR Flash range of 50 feet
  5. CF up to 32 Gig - 4 gig card holds up to 10 - 15,000 photos
  6. Color by Day / Mono at Night
  7. 1080 High Definition images
  8. Operating tempatures - -20 to +120 degrees

Predator Trailcams - All new for the Xtinction & Evolution XR is "One touch set-up"

  1. "One touch set-up feature" Install batteries, Insert storage device choose - one touch option ans walk away! Its that simple.
  2. The Xtinction features included - Double Vision Technology which uses 32 or 48 "True" infrared emitters. With 32 emitters activated the nighttime range will be 25 - 30ft, depending on conditions and settings. If 48 emitters are activated the nightime range will increase out to 40+ feet.
  3. High Resolution Images - 3.2 Day / 1.3 Night.
  4. Both units come standard with Next Generation Camo.
  5. 4 digit securtiy code can be entered on both units to prevent theft.
  6. Both photos and videos can be viewed in the field.

I have also been told that improvements have been made to increase the overall battery life of these units.

Moultrie Game Spy Management system - New units for 2009 Include the following features - (4 New Models)

Moultrie has really made some big improvements to their trail camera lineup for this year.  Just about every complaint that customers had about these units has been addressed.  They are smaller, the batteries and flash card are eaiser to access, and the trigger speed has been improved as well.  The only thing that has been sacrificed in this year's units is they now take 4 D-cell batteries instead of 6, which will give up some battery life in order to acheive a smaller package.  After looking at the cameras firsthand, I think it was a good trade-off.

Game Spy I-45 Includes -

  1. 4.0 Mega Pixel
  2. 50ft Flash Range
  3. Tempature, moon phase, time, date and camera ID on every photo and video
  4. Color during the day / IR during night
  5. Three picture resolutions / two video resolutions
  6. Operates on 4 D-cell batteries
  7. Upgradeable software

Game Spy I-65 Includes -

  1. 6.0 Mega pixel images
  2. 1.8 inch built-in picture and video viewer
  3. Barometric pressure
  4. Password security
  5. Time-lapse mode
  6. Four picture resolutions
  7. The I-65 Also includes all the features of the I-45!

Two other units, the Game Spy M-45 & M-65 are both available with the same features as the I-45 and I-65 except with a standard flash unit, not infrared.

But these great new features aren't even the best part about these new Moultrie units.  With all of the new units you can at anytime purchase a modem which attaches to the unit and will wirelessly transmit images through AT&T's cellular network. Once the images are sent you can log into Moultrie's new Game Management website which will offer you private access to manage your photos, data and cameras all through your computer once signed up.  I have to admit this is pretty cool that you can buy the moden attachment when your ready.  Retail cost on the modem unit is going to be around $150.


The new Moultrie I-45 and I-65 trail cameras.  You can see the overall package has been completely redesigned for this year.


The website being displayed above the Moultrie's Game Management site where you can manage your cameras and images when using the modem adapter.

New Cuddeback Units for 2009

The folks at Cuddeback are releasing two new units for 2009, however they are still in production and didn't have any working samples for us to look at or photograph.  We did get some specs on the forthcoming cameras though.  The two new units are the NoFlash X2 and the Expert X2.  These are essentially upgraded versions of the old NoFlash and Expert units with a few improvements.  The NoFlash X2 will take 5.0 mega pixel images during the day and 1.3 mega pixel black and white images by night.  The interesting part about the NoFlash X2 is that it uses two separate cameras for taking pictures by day and by night., meaning each one is optimized for the best quality at both times.  The NoFlash X2 also features 15 second delays during both day and night and you can set different delays for each.  Video clips are now shot at 18 frames per second for higher quality.

Both cameras will now accept SD cards instead of CF cards (which are more expensive and harder to find than SD) and a new "Genius" mounting system.  The Expert X2 has all the same features as the NoFlash X2 in a standard flash camera, however it only has a minimum 30 second delay at night and 15 second delay during the daytime.  As soon as we get some more information or photos we'll be sure to blog about them.

It should also be noted that a new firmware version has been released for the Capture IR cameras, which greatly increases the flash range of these cameras.  Visit Cuddeback's website to download the firmware and upgrade your camera today.

Most importantly we will be stocking, selling and testing all units right here at Bowhunting.com!

To view photo samples you can check out our new site - TrailCameras.com!

Making a Mock Scrape.

by John Mueller 2. November 2008 14:58
John Mueller

Making a Mock Scrape 

Last Saturday I found a great spot for a mock Scrape. There is a long ridge that slopes down along a small creek on my property, creating a natural funnel. At the end of the ridge is a nice trail leading from my field that crosses the creek. I found a small branch that overhung the trail. This is very important. There must be a low overhanging branch to make the scrape under. The deer also leave scent on the branch with their forehead glands. As you can see in this picture I also broke the branch to add a little visual effect.

 

Notice the broken branch above the deer.

 

 

Then I brushed all of the leaves from a 3’ diameter circle under the branch with a stick. After removing the leaf litter I made some long scrapes in the dirt like a deer’s hooves would make. I like to make it look as real as possible. You can add some scent if you want, but I have found it is not necessary.

 

When I returned on Sunday to check the scrape a deer had worked it and added another a few feet away. I then went and got my trail camera and set it up on the new scrape. I had lots of action in just a few days. Right now is a great time to make mock scrapes. The bucks are really hitting the scrapes hard at this time. It’s a great way to see what bucks are in your area. Here are a few that worked my mock scrape.

 

 

This guy looks like an old bruiser.

 

Another big bodied visitor.

 

A good young buck working the scrape.

Notice that all of this activity is under the cover of darkness. That is why I usually don't hunt over scrapes. But it is a great way to get an inventory of your bucks. You can get your trail cameras and scents right here on Bowhunting.com in the shopping section if you need one.

Deer Hunting Scrapes - It Won't Be Long Now!

by John Mueller 27. October 2008 13:50
John Mueller

IT WON”T BE LONG NOW

  

            The scrapeing is going on strong at my place in IL right now. I found a hot scrape last weekend and set my Moultrie I40 up on it. I was pleasantly surprised this weekend by the results. I got pics of a quite a few different bucks using it. Most of the big guys were at night but that may change in a week or 2.

 

            Here is a pic. of a real nice 10 pointer I had an encounter with 2 weeks ago right at dark. I had him at 40 yards but couldn’t see my pins. At least he is still around.

 

 

The Big 10

 

I got a few action shots of the bucks with their antlers in the branches too. I may have to change the I40 over to the video mode. It has that option built in.

 

I can almost reach it.

 

 

Giving it a thrashing.

 

 

 

 

         Another visitor. 

 

 

Big bodied 8 pointer.

 

 

            If you’re interested in putting a trail camera on your own scrapes, you can order yours right here on Bowhunting.com. Check out the trail cam section

  

Trail Camera Review - Predator Evolution

by Todd Graf 7. September 2008 06:19
Todd Graf

Predator Evolution digital trail camera –First and foremost, please don’t get this post confused.  This review is on the Predator Evolution trail camera, not the new Predator Xtinction trail camera. We are still waiting to get a new unit in our hands for testing. I heard they are having some difficulties getting parts but they are on the way shortly.  As soon as we get a new unit and have a chance to try it out we will let you know.

The Pros:

The video mode is super cool on mineral licks and scrapes! This is probably one of my favorite features of this camera.  Still photos are great, but there's just something about watching a big buck working a scrape from close up that gets me excited.  Plus having multiple angles of the buck's rack can allow you to see all those little  stickers and kickers that are sometimes hiddenin standard photos.  The LCD touchscreen is cool for programming the unit and viewing photos in the field.  More than once I have found myself heading out for an evening's hunt only to stop and check my photos on the way in.  The Predator Evolution is a very compact trail camera which makes it easy to carry around the woods in a fanny pack. The unit comes with a screw-in bracket for attaching the camera to trees easily.  What makes this particular bracket nice is that by simply removing a pin you can take the camera off the tree to making changing batteries and reviewing photos easy, and simply replace the pin to secure the camera when you are done. It works well and is one of the better attaching mechanicsms that I have used.

The trigger speed on the Predator Evolution is also a huge plus.  To put it simply, it's probably the fastest trigger speed of any camera I've ever tested or owned.  I've gotten a ton of pictures of birds as they fly by the front of the camera, which is pretty impressive.

The Cons:

The battery life of this unit is not the best in the world, and replacing 10 AA batteries every few weeks can get expensive quick.  My advice would be to buy rechargeables as soon as possible.  You'll thank me later!  Also, the images are kind of small. I wish you got a little larger picture so you could blow them up if you got a cool shot.  Sometimes it can be difficult to see all the details of a buck's rack or body, especially if they are a little further away.  The last downside to this camera is the performance of the LCD screen in really cold weather.  Just like your cell phone if you leave it in your truck by accident, the LCD screen gets extremely sluggish when it's cold, which can make reviewing images tedious.  And when it's that cold, you don't have much patience for staying still too long!

This photo shows how good the day time photos can be.

 

Here I must have had the unit programmed improperly, as there was plenty of daylight but yet it still took an IR shot.

Not sure why these bucks bucks got freaked out, the unit is very quiet and has no flash.

The IR flash range on the Evolution is decent, but not great.  I am hoping in the new Xteniction unit's IR will reach out further.

Of course I save the best for last - All bowhunters and dee hunters in general  will like this - if you want to get some great videos, this unit can do it!

Check out some of these videos....

Struting Turkey Video

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=3310603642800468404

20 Plus deer in Field - Pretty cool. You know at least one good buck has to be out there somewhere!

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-9007518874748441970

Buck at Licking Branch

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-8990171210984315572

 

Trail Cameras & Horseflies

by Todd Graf 30. August 2008 15:05
Todd Graf

I have finally admitted to having a problem when it comes to trail cameras - I am addicted! I just really enjoy using and trying all of the camera models. I can still remember the film days, collecting all the film out of my Camtrakkers and rushing to Wal-Mart to get the photos developed in an hour. I know I am not the only one who did that! I don’t even want to think about how much money I had spent – I try to forget those days. Digital cameras rock. Many of you know that we have launched a new site where our pro-staff is reporting which trail cameras really work well and which ones don’t. Check it out at www.trailcam.com. If you have any questions or comments let us know.  We're also working to make sure that we have all models in stock and ready to ship so if you're looking for a new trail camera, be sure to check us out.

Here are some photos from this year - take a look……

 

Camtrakker - The highest quality digital trail camera pictures you'll ever get! 

Another shot from my CamTrakker - you simply can't beat them for quality photos!

At TrailCam.Com we're committed to testing them all!!! We will keep you informed this season to which one of the trail cameras we test works the best.

A shot from the new CamTrakker MK-8 - It has a super long lasting battery and the flash range is amazing.

This shot is from my new Reconyx RC60.  I saw the Drury's pushing this unit so I had to give it a chance. So far I have been impressed with it. Battery life has been good, photos are clear both day and night but the IR range could be a little better. I am still testing this unit -  I will let you know my final thoughts later this year.

The horseflies are really starting to tick me off this year, I don't think I have ever seen them this bad!




About the Authors

The Bowhunting.com staff is made up of "Average Joe" bowhunters from around the country who are serious about one thing - BOWHUNTING.  Keep up to date with them as they work year-round at persuing their passion and bring you the most up-to-date information on bowhunting gear and archery equipment.

» Click here to learn more about the Bowhunting.com Staff.

Editorial Disclaimer

The opinions expressed by Hunting Network LLC bloggers and by those members providing comments are theirs alone, and do not necessarily reflect the opinions or policies of Hunting Network LLC. Hunting Network LLC is not responsible for the accuracy of any of the information supplied by bloggers or forum participants. Hunting Network LLC is not responsible for any offense caused inadvertently through interpretation of grammar, punctuation or language.


Sitemap